in Houston, Texas
Documents show Circuit of the Americas wants $566K solar panel handout
Tuesday, Aug 21, 2012, 11:59AM CST
By Mark Lisheron
solar

We can’t be sure what is more surprising: that it took so long for Circuit of the Americas to ask for a half a million dollar Austin Energy solar power handout or that the public was able to find out about it.

Credit the Austin American-Statesman again for going after documents attesting to the request by the operators of a new Formula One racetrack in Travis County for no more than $566,200 over the next decade for a solar array.

The Statesman has tracked an agreement with the state for as much as $250 million in taxpayer funds to be returned to Circuit of the Americas for meeting certain sales tax goals in its first decade of operation.

Local government has offered up taxpayers as partners in two road expansions needed by the track. There may be other partnerships the public isn’t aware of because Circuit of the Americas would rather you didn’t know so much about their internal business affairs.

In exchange, the company has generously offered to pay some, but not all, of the expense to send Austin city officials on a Formula One fact-finding junket to England.

Showing a deep environmental commitment, Circuit of the Americas has a plan for a series of solar panels that could produce 330,000 kilowatt hours, the equivalent of power use for 28 average homes per year or 40 percent of the power needed for the track site -- when it isn’t in use.

It is a commitment forged by years of sending two dozen cars with engines getting five miles to the gallon for 190 miles around tracks all over the world.

Why else would a racing company have its own sustainability director?

Whether or not the company fulfills its grand commitment depends on the incentive, courtesy of Austin Energy rate payers, paid in advance, Edgar Farrera, the sustainability director, says.

As it did during the time of the Great Stimulus Giveaway of 2009, solar energy proved time and again its value as a taxpayer investment, with projects often paying for themselves in less than 75 years.

Austin Energy has entertained asking its rate payers to subsidize a $700-$800 million project to put solar panels on every major building in Austin.

What is another $566,200 in the name of sustainability?

***
Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org or on Twitter at @marktxwatchdog.

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Photo of solar panels by flickr user Photo Mojo Mike, used via a Creative Commons license.

Should bridge inspections be open to public?
Monday, Aug 20, 2012, 05:13PM CST
By Mike Cronin
bridges

A majority of the states prohibit the release of detailed bridge inspection information, citing terrorist threats, the Corpus Christi Caller-Times reports.

The newspaper via a public records request has asked for a detailed engineering report on the Harbor Bridge (in Corpus Christi). It appears the public has a clear interest here, given state plans for replacement of the bridge despite years of renovation that have upped the Harbor Bridge’s safety rating to a “6,” or “satisfactory, from a “4,” or “poor,” in 2001.

The Texas Department of Transportation has referred the request to the Texas Attorney General. But there the effort may stall.

In withholding the records of other bridges from public release, the Texas Department of Transportation has, at least seven times since 2002, cited not the Homeland Security Act but a federal law that prevents highway safety information from being used as evidence in lawsuits. This law, the department argues, applies to all bridges on any public road.

The attorney general has agreed that the law can be used to withhold the information from the public, even outside the courtroom.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security officials have advised states against the release of details about critical infrastructure.  Following that advice, at least 30 states refuse release of information relating to the comprehensive state of bridges, the Caller-Times found.

But because of the way many bridges are designed, “failure of a single part” can bring them down, the newspaper reports. So keeping specific details of bridge inspections wouldn’t seem to affect a terrorist’s success rate.

The ideal scenario would be one in which governments develop a way to distribute bridge information to the public that would satisfy all concerned, said David Goldberg, spokesman for Transportation for America, a Washington, D.C.-nonprofit organization that surveyed the state of the nation's bridges last year.

"It makes sense that (government officials) would need some system or process for how they share the information, under what circumstances," Goldberg told the newspaper. "There should certainly be an open and less than cumbersome process for sharing with entities like the news media that have a broader public platform."

Drivers can get a broad sense of how safe their bridges are from the National Bridge Inventory, which listed the bridge in Minneapolis that collapsed five years ago as “structurally deficient” in 2005. The website NationalBridges.com has made the data searchable.

***
Contact Mike Cronin at mike@texaswatchdog.org or 713-228-2850. Follow him on Twitter @michaelccronon.

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Photo of bridges by flickr user cindy47452, used via a Creative Commons license.

La Marque now can’t account for up to $2 million in Hurricane Ike disaster aid
Monday, Aug 20, 2012, 03:06PM CST
By Curt Olson
toilet

Hurricane Ike left a lot of damage in its wake, and that now includes La Marque city officials who can’t account for up to $2 million in post-Ike federal disaster money and for projects that received funding but weren’t completed.

City leaders at the time did not earmark money to specific accounts to cover Ike damage in the city. The city may be required to return money to the feds, the Galveston Daily News reports.

Mayor Bobby Hocking says the early indication is the money is still in city coffers, but that he suspects city leaders used part of the post-Ike federal disaster funds to balance the city budget. The amount in question amounts to almost two-thirds of the total $3.23 million received by the city.

“Where there’s smoke, there’s fire. We have a lot of smoke. How big the fire is, I don’t know,” Hocking was reported as saying.

City Emergency Management Coordinator Jennifer Pierce said she was alerted to discrepancies by inspectors with the Texas Division of Emergency Management.

The Daily News detailed these questionable projects:

  • The repair of the roof at the city public works building using $12,000 in insurance proceeds and $5,000 in federal disaster aid. City records show the money was spent, but the project was never completed.
  • The replacement of the city’s redwood welcome sign on state Highway 3. The city received $3,071 and has a work order showing the work was completed. But as of Friday when a reporter checked, the sign was not up.

In other cases, projects were completed under budget, but the city did not return the excess money to the feds as required.

The spending missteps couldn’t come at a worse time. City council members were briefed last month on options to close a $1 million shortfall as they plan the 2012-13 city budget.

***
Contact Curt Olson at curt@texaswatchdog.org or 512-557-3800. Follow him on Twitter @olson_curt.

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Photo of 'What a Waste' by flickr user KoraFotoMorgana, used via a Creative Commons license.

Personnel records - like those of 4 fired Denton County prosecutors - key to keeping eye on government
Monday, Aug 20, 2012, 01:44PM CST
By Steve Miller
files

When four prosecutors from the Denton County District Attorney’s office were fired in June, the Denton Record-Chronicle filed an open records request for their personnel files.

On the 10th day after it received the July 2 request, Denton County, in accordance with the law, told the newspaper that it would ask for a ruling from the AG’s office.

But after the newspaper ran a story July 7 on the terminations, without the information from the files, the county withdrew its request for a ruling from the state. On July 24, it provided the records to the newspaper, which recounts the saga here.

Did the county stall as a tactic to obscure the story?

“The attorney general’s opinion was sought on the 10th day after the request, which is the deadline day,” notes a DRC piece dated Saturday. “The request was withdrawn July 24, the deadline day for filing a brief defending the arguments to withhold the files with the attorney general’s office. That gave the story the longest possible time to cool. But (the DA’s spokesperson Jamie Beck) said that was not the intention of her office.

“I can assure you that there was no deliberate attempt to use the open-records laws to circumvent releasing the records in a timely way,” she said.

Personnel records are public records, as has been decided numerous times by the state Attorney General’s office, with restrictions. These records are key to keeping the public informed as to just how the employees it pays are hired and fired, as well as just who these people are. Most people hired by a publicly-funded entity are informed that some of their information is public.

The Bandera County Courier used personnel records to shed light on a tangled mess leading up to the termination of a former sheriff’s deputy, Mario Hernandez.

The Courier has been crusading for months to obtain the details of a settlement made between the county and Hernandez.

It has apparently given up finding out the details -- the details of a legal settlement are well-protected in most states, even when they involve public employees.

Big stories have been broken via open records requests for personnel information; witness the case of the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association, which handed over a Ford pickup truck and thousands of dollars to a couple of canned employees. The story was launched initially by a couple of tips, then this paragraph in an open records request:

All records, letters, correspondence and other communication related to the resignation or termination of Reggie Warren and Bill Knarr. This would include memos, emails, letters of resignation or other orders to Knarr and Warren regarding the end of their employment from TWIA.

The story led to a legislative investigation and the state takeover of the agency.

***
Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.

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Photo of file cabinet by flickr user shawnogram, used via a Creative Commons license.

Fraud in Texas’ Medicaid dental program followed spending boom
Monday, Aug 20, 2012, 12:36PM CST
By Mark Lisheron
teeth

Texas has yet to get a handle on millions of dollars in fraud, an unintended consequence of a fourfold increase in spending on dental services provided by the state’s Medicaid program.

The state Department of Health and Human Services has denied $8.2 million in Medicaid claims made by 26 dentists and orthodontists across the state under suspicion of fraudulent billing for procedures like cosmetic braces not normally covered by Medicaid or unnecessary root canals, the Wall Street Journal reports.

An audit of the 600 reimbursement requests done at the state’s request by Christine Ellis, a Dallas orthodontist, found in more than 90 percent of the cases the dental work was not covered by Medicaid.

"The fraud is statewide,” Ellis told the Journal, “and has reached the hundreds of millions of dollars.”

The crackdown on reimbursement and fraud, however, has caused some dental practices to stop taking Medicaid patients, while other dental practices have closed up altogether, the story says.

In January the state Attorney General began an investigation into the billing practices of 31 orthodontists in the state. In June the state sued All Smiles Dental Professionals P.C., alleging the company billed Medicaid for dental work that was not necessary and, in some cases, not done. The state clampdown follows an extensive investigation by WFAA News 8 in Dallas.

All Smiles has since closed 13 orthodontic offices in the Dallas area, the Journal says.

The explosion of fraud grew out of the settlement in 2007 of a 14-year-old class action lawsuit filed by parents who said the state was negligent in providing preventative dental care for children enrolled in Medicaid.

In that year the Legislature approved spending $1.8 billion to expand Medicaid dental services for children. Payments to orthodontists and dentists have since increased by four times, to $1.4 billion in 2011, more than any other state in the country.

In 2007 1.1 million or 38.5 percent of Texas children on Medicaid got dental service through the program. By 2010 that number jumped to 1.6 million or 51.6 percent of all children on Medicaid, according to a report given in January to the state House Committee on Public Health by Health and Human Services. (Please see pages 24-31 of the report here.)

Orthodontic care claims alone increased from $102 million to $185 million between 2008 and 2010, the report says.

The problem with fraud in Texas has made its way into a report in April by the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. (Please see pages 16-19, here.)

***
Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org or on Twitter at @marktxwatchdog.

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Photo of teeth by flickr user Phoenix Dark-Knight, used via a Creative Commons license.

Metro board wants voters in November to say yes to sales tax sharing plan (Correction Appended)
Friday, Aug 17, 2012, 05:25PM CST
By Mike Cronin
Metro

The Metropolitan Transit Authority board Friday voted 8-1 to ask voters in November to approve a sales tax sharing plan with its partner communities through 2025.

The compromise plan by board chairman Gilbert Garcia continues the current agreement in which Metro distributes up to 25 percent of the sales tax revenue it collects every year to Harris County, Houston and 14 other cities.

If voters say yes, any sales tax growth above what the transit authority collects in 2014 would be split equally by Metro and its service areas for the following 10 years.

Garcia estimated the amount of added revenue for Metro is about $400 million, critical to paying down existing debt and adding as many as 200 new buses.

“This will help us address two key areas of our mission: fiscal responsibility and ridership,” Garcia said.

In an odd twist, a no vote to reject the Metro proposal in November would actually allow Metro to keep all of the sales taxes it collects.

The Metro Board on Aug. 3 had approved a rough draft for a referendum asking voters directly to approve allowing Metro to keep all of its sale tax revenue.

Board member Christof Spieler said he voted against the referendum language because it does not give enough money to transit, but admitted “this is probably the best deal we can get in the political climate of 2012.”

Organizers for Keep Houston Moving Forward, a political action committee supporting Metro and transit projects created the PAC to seek voter approval for whatever plan the Metro Board approved.

"We want a 'Yes' vote in November for the referendum the Board approved on Friday," PAC spokeswoman Sue Davis told Texas Watchdog. "We are working closely with Metro Chairman Gilbert Garcia to support the ballot initiative."

Houston Rapid Transit JV, a contractor for Metro has donated $20,000 to the PAC, according to a Texas Tribune database.

It comprises the  Parsons Transportation Group, of Pasadena, Calif.; Granite Construction Company, of Watson, Calif.; Kiewit Texas Construction L.P. of Fort Worth; and Stacy and Witbeck, Inc., an engineering company based in Alameda, Calif.

Keep Houston Moving Forward hired Storefront Political Media, “a San Francisco-based Democratic political consulting firm,” for $42,000 for “consulting and message development,” documents filed with the Texas Ethics Commission show.

Mayor Annise Parker hired Storefront Political Media for her 2009 campaign, according to the company’s website. Parker appoints five of Metro’s nine board members: Garcia, Spieler, Vice Chairman Allen Watson, Carrin Patman, Dwight Jefferson and are the others.

The PAC also hired two other companies for consulting work: Houston-based Lone Star Strategies LLC for $5,000 and K Chace Consulting for about $14,000.

On the “yes” side of the referendum is Houstonians for Responsible Growth, a political action committee that would not like to see revenue cut for road construction and maintenance in Houston’s suburbs.

Kendall Miller, president of the development company, Tanglewood Corporation, has donated $6,000 to support it.

The two other real estate executives who have donated $6,000 to the Houstonians for Responsible Growth PAC are Stephen Sweet, South Texas division partner at Alliance Residential Company, of Phoenix; and James Gustafson of Houston’s The Gustafson Group.

Walter Mischer Jr., partner at Mischer Investments, L.P and part of the well-known Houston family line of developers donated $2,500 to the PAC.

Editor's note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly implied that the Keep Houston Moving Forward PAC wanted a 'no' vote on the November ballot initiative. Texas Watchdog regrets the error. In addition, an earlier version of this story linked to another company from the K Chace Consulting hyperlink. That hyperlink also misspelled the company. That link has been removed and the name fixed.

***
Contact Mike Cronin at mike@texaswatchdog.org or 713-228-2850. Follow him on Twitter at@michaelccronin or @texaswatchdog.

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Photo of Metro by flickr user hyku, used via a Creative Commons license.

State blacklists vendors who go on contracting with federal and local agencies
Friday, Aug 17, 2012, 12:21PM CST
By Steve Miller
Bars

When the state stops doing business with a vendor, you might suspect the company of a magnificent scam of the explosive headline kind.

Naw. Judging from the state’s list of ten blacklisted vendors, “improper invoicing practices” and “misrepresentations in documents submitted for bidding,” are more like it.

So, is it a big deal? The state can and does bar companies from doing business for a period of up to five years with state agencies. Debarment does not, however, stop a company from contracting with federal or local agencies, RJ DeSilva, a spokesman for the Texas Comptroller’s office, said in an email.

“Everything pertains to state contracts,” he wrote. DeSilva did not return phone calls.

Debarment hasn’t bothered the city of Dallas, which continues to use two of those banned companies.

Tex-American Recycling of Forth Worth, banned for five years by the state since Aug. 1, 2008, does scrap tire pickup for the city. Fine Line Products, of Columbus, Ohio, suspended for five years on October 15, 2009, sold $24,600 worth of smoke detectors to the city in January of 2010.

The Houston Independent School District paid an invoice of $1,025 from Tex-American last year, records show.

A person answering the phone at Fine Line declined to comment. Tex-American could not be reached for comment. Calls and emails to representatives of the city of Dallas were not returned.

The state can bar a vendor for several actions in according to state government code. Violations include fraud, contract breach, poor performance, or misrepresentation during bidding or in a proposal.

Any company bidding or proposing to work for the state must certify that it is not on a list of debarred vendors for federal contracts.

For a state to use a debarred federal vendor is a serious offense in other states.

DeSilva wrote that “before a state agency awards a contract it looks at the federal debarment list.”

Apparently it doesn’t work the other way around. The federal government spent $100,968 with Fine Line  in 2011, including a deal to provide gloves to a military installation in Texarkana.

***

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.

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Photo of  Bars by flickr user Lori_NY, used via a Creative Commons license.

Surprise: shoppers go out of their way to avoid ban on plastic grocery bags
Friday, Aug 17, 2012, 11:16AM CST
By Mark Lisheron
Plastic

Soaring on righteous fervor, the Austin City Council in March somehow neglected to make provision to punish citizens disloyal enough to shop outside of the limits of its ban on plastic grocery bags.

It seems, based on a new study by the National Center for Policy Analysis, that shoppers facing the inconvenience in Los Angeles County have for the last year been sneaking across the ban borders to shop.

Overall, sales at stores inside the Polyethylene Wall were down by 3.3 percent. Sales just outside the wall were up by 3.4 percent, according the survey of store managers in and out of Los Angeles County.

At nearly 80 percent of stores in the ban zone sales were off by nearly 6 percent. At 60 percent of the stores outside the zone sales were up by 9 percent.

Bag-ban managers in every store surveyed laid off at least one employee and staffing overall was down 10 percent, the study says. Employment at the outside stores was up, but by just 2.4 percent.

Add to that the amount of energy shoppers are expending to skirt the ban and you have what the Center’s study refers to as unintended consequences.

It might be good to establish at this point that National Center for Policy Analysis is a nonprofit organization in the business of questioning government regulation while promoting a competitive and entrepreneurial free market.

Not a likely candidate to be giving advice to a City Council that regularly ignored past warnings of  those unintended consequences and accepted as fact plastic bag cleanup costs that had been mistakenly inflated by 366 percent.

But having been prescient enough to make it a crime for stores to use plastic bags after March of 2013, it isn’t too late for the City Council to include penalties for people with the temerity to shop where they want to shop.

***

Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org or on Twitter at @marktxwatchdog.
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Photo of Plastic by flickr user mtsofan, used via a Creative Commons license.

 

Travis County auditor dumped after investigation into growing department
Thursday, Aug 16, 2012, 02:45PM CST
By Mark Lisheron
Gavel

Astonished to learn that after 24 years a $9 million-a-year fiefdom had grown in their midst, Travis County district judges Wednesday fired county auditor Susan Spataro.

The 15-0 vote came a little less than two months after a fine bit of investigative reporting by the Austin American-Statesman revealed that Travis County taxpayers were paying far more for their auditing department than any other urban area in Texas.

Spataro had for more than two decades convinced these judges to approve the growth of her department to 82 employees. They signed off on a budget that included her $180,000 a year salary and annual salaries of more than $100,000 for roughly 14 of her employees, according to the Statesman.

Thanks to the Statesman, the judges came to learn Spataro was using her expanded staff for work outside the usual auditor’s purview. And to divert money in her budget for expenses like legislative consulting at $6,500 a month and $103,000 for a security system for her office.

In an effort to spare the public the shock of their discovery, the judges said nothing nor permitted any citizen comment before taking their vote, according to a Statesman report. The matter was disposed of a few minutes, with one small tribute for the work done by one of the county’s highest paid employees.

After the meeting, District Judge Brenda Kennedy, who heads a committee of judges that is supposed to keep an eye on the auditor, told the newspaper, "The level of confidence and trust had diminished to the extent that it would not be an asset as far as going forward with future dealings."

District Judge John Dietz said, "There was a concern about the extent of her involvement in the executive decisions of the county while at the same time having audit responsibilities for those decisions. I was also concerned about the growth and size of her budget.”

Leroy Nellis, the county’s budget director, thought, quite respectfully, the judges’ decision was bunk.

"I believe Susan and her staff have performed exemplary (sic), and I think that Susan has assembled one of the finest groups of financial talent in the state."

***

Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org or on Twitter at @marktxwatchdog.

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Photo of Gavel by flickr user s_falkow, used via a Creative Commons license.

 

Record jumbotron blots out academic value questions in Carthage
Thursday, Aug 16, 2012, 02:17PM CST
By Curt Olson
Scoreboard

Carthage Independent School District has its priorities straight. The biggest stadium jumbotron screen in Texas to go along with high student spending, middling academic results and a virtual freeze on hiring teachers.

The East Texas district of 2,800 students, winners of three straight 3A state football championships in 2008-10, the place “where champions are educated,” as its website crows, has laid out $750,000 for a 24-ton, 50-foot-high scoreboard with a 1,200 square-foot screen, the
Longview News-Journal reports.

Spending has not been a problem for Carthage ISD. According to the state Comptroller’s Financial Allocation Study for Texas has one of the higher annual rates of spending per pupil, $10,299.

Couple it with the overall academic progress and Carthage ISD got a rating of 1 ½  out of a top grade of 5 stars. The study showed the district maintaining a $13.7 million balance in its general fund when $4.9 million was considered optimum.

And while per pupil spending remained high, it wasn’t because of staff. Carthage added just 1.5 teacher positions and one principal for this past school year as compared to the year before, according to a Texas Tribune database. At the same time, the district cut seven teacher, two specialized educator and almost one assistant principal positions.

The district paid for its mammoth scoreboard from a recent school bond issue. Some people in the district love it and others think it’s wasteful spending, the News-Journal says.

While Friday night lights will be brighter than ever before on the football field in Carthage, taxpayers may wonder whether things are shining just as bright in the classroom.

***

Contact Curt Olson at curt@texaswatchdog.org or 512-557-3800. Follow him on Twitter @olson_curt.

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Photo of Scoreboard by flickr user BariD, used via a Creative Commons license.

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Court trends advise tempered enthusiasm for HB 34 eyewitness ID reforms Does this sound like a suggestive photo array to put before a witness?A witness described being robbed at gunpoint by a “[b]lack male,...
Update:2 years 8 months
Grits for Breakfast
MAY 22, 2917 / Theodore Dalrymple on secularization and transcendence THE SECULARIZATION of Europe is hardly any secret. Religion's long, melancholy, withdrawing roar, as Matthew Arnold put it, is a roar no...
Update:2 years 8 months
Unca Darrell
MAY 10 / James B. Comey . . . . . . needed firing. Everything he did during the 2016 election was wrong. He was wrong . . . . . . back in July to release information...
Update:2 years 9 months
Unca Darrell
Droppin' F bombs, Beto O'Rourke style It's not often that a politician decides to start cursing repeatedly during speeches and interviews. But that hasn't stopped...
Update:2 years 10 months
Rick Perry vs The World
APRIL 5, 2017 / Weeding out the audience at the Alley is . . . . . . a feature, not a bug. Houston's Alley Theatre is running "An Act of God," a loosely dramatized collection of irreverent one-liners...
Update:2 years 10 months
Unca Darrell
Statewide primary rumors It's that stage of the election cycle where politicians are trying to figure out if they should run for something else or stay put. ...
Update:2 years 10 months
Rick Perry vs The World
Is Ted Cruz vulnerable? Is Ted Cruz vulnerable? Not really. Sure, he's not liked, Texans think Ted puts Ted first, his approval rating is upside down, etc...
Update:2 years 10 months
Rick Perry vs The World
MARCH 16, 2017 / Jim Webb on what it means to be a redneck, and . . . . . . why redneck culture matters. In 2004 Jim Webb wrote Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America. Though the 2016 presidential...
Update:2 years 11 months
Unca Darrell
MARCH 3, 2017 -- Goodbye, and thanks, to Thomas Sowell THOMAS SOWELL, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and one of America's most important public intellectuals, retired from...
Update:2 years 11 months
Unca Darrell
March 2, 2017 / The poem our teachers got wrong TWO ROADS diverged in a wood, and I -- I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. Generations of commencement...
Update:2 years 11 months
Unca Darrell
FEBRUARY 27 / Eric Hoffer on . . . . . . baby boomers and alienated intellectuals. "SCRATCH AN INTELLECTUAL, and you find a would-be aristocrat who loathes the sight, the...
Update:2 years 11 months
Unca Darrell
2017 Project: January “Progress” There are two different ways to interpret my 2017 project: that it's a way more complicated New Years Resolution, or that it is essentially...
Update:3 years 1 week
Greg's Opinion
Ted Cruz's first senate term in a nutshell The National Review's Tim Alberta switched to Politico, and one of his opening pieces put Ted Cruz's first term in a nutshell It...
Update:3 years 2 weeks
Rick Perry vs The World
Andrea Parquet-Taylor named KTVT CBS 11 news director Former KHOU 11 assistant news director Andrea Parquet-Taylor named Vice President, News Director for KTVT CBS 11 Andrea...
Update:3 years 3 weeks
Mike McGuff
VIDEO: KPRC 2 10pm newscast (1-24-99) ...
Update:3 years 3 weeks
Mike McGuff
Democrats actually thought Wendy Davis was a serious candidate? Hat tip to Willisms: VIDEO- Wendy Davis being Wendy Davis: https://t.co/SHq3ACGVDJ #txlege— Will Franklin (@WILLisms) January 24,...
Update:3 years 3 weeks
Rick Perry vs The World
Luke Bryan to sing National Anthem as part of Super Bowl LI on FOX ​ Country music superstar LUKE BRYAN will sing the National Anthem as part of Super Bowl LI pregame festivities at NRG Stadium in Houston...
Update:3 years 3 weeks
Mike McGuff
Tweets
Karen Townsend | 7 years 8 months
"Patrick F. Kennedy is a career foreign service officer" - http://t.co/GOrCe0IS
Peter Corbett ✈ | 7 years 8 months
I'm at McCarran International Airport (LAS) w/ @almacy http://t.co/KvmId07i
KERA Public Media | 7 years 8 months
TONIGHT at 7pm on KERA TV: Presidential Debate: Learn more at PBS NewsHour. http://t.co/Z9kYdun8
PBS MediaShift | 7 years 8 months
Tech Snafus Make Bill O'Reilly/Jon Stewart 'Rumble' More of a Stumble http://t.co/4OfeBlrG (@kegill | @pbsmediashift) #rumble2012
Will Sullivan | 7 years 8 months
Great addition, been burned too much by bad subs. "Google Play Announces Free Trials For In-App Subscription Services" http://t.co/TOLgRVak
TxDOT | 7 years 8 months
I-35W/North Tarrant Express #constantcontact http://t.co/QDzrQumu
keyetv | 7 years 8 months
Serial shotgun robbers suspects arrested. http://t.co/ka8T4U9B
Karen Townsend | 7 years 8 months
Aren't State Dept career people suppose to be non-partisan? Not the political appointees, the career people. #Libya
San Antonio Current | 7 years 8 months
Go ahead, chalk it up http://t.co/YMWpC5wM #satx #chalkitup
Caller.com | 7 years 8 months
Scanner: Bathroom on fire in 600 block of Virginia, CC fire dept. on the way
Ballotpedia | 7 years 8 months
Does your state offer early voting? Do you qualify? Find out! #election2012 http://t.co/eodxBYVD
Dallas Morning News | 7 years 8 months
Why a Dallas-area cycling coach believed Lance Armstrong was drug-free (video) http://t.co/gURdYkj1
Caller.com | 7 years 8 months
Dozens of illegal waste dumpers sentenced in Jim Wells Co.; others on the run: http://t.co/NgerCdsQ
Karen Townsend | 7 years 8 months
Consistently impressed w/raullabrador when I listen to him in Congressional hearings. #Libya
Cory Crow | 7 years 8 months
Diigo: United raises fares by up to $10 per round trip - Business - http://t.co/kWY8gwPV http://t.co/bw25JP5R
News 4 WOAI | 7 years 8 months
If you see news in or around San Antonio 'SEND IT' to @NEWS4WOAI here: http://t.co/uMqbMXQv OR email us at: NEWSDESK@WOAITV.COM
swamplot | 7 years 8 months
Mining Houston Garbage for Recycling and Compost Gold http://t.co/HMMBArMX
swamplot | 7 years 8 months
Daily Demolition Report: Tulane Highway http://t.co/JXmkSx11
KFDA NewsChannel10 | 7 years 8 months
Obama and Romney: Where they stand on the issues http://t.co/y3VrPfkM
Williamson County | 7 years 8 months
Mental Health Awareness Week FREE Webinar:"Understanding Depression-How to Help You or a Loved One" Thurs,Oct 11@1pm-https://t.co/YUWi19WY
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