in Houston, Texas
Voter Fraud
Surprise: shoppers go out of their way to avoid ban on plastic grocery bags
Friday, Aug 17, 2012, 11:16AM CST
By Mark Lisheron
Plastic

Soaring on righteous fervor, the Austin City Council in March somehow neglected to make provision to punish citizens disloyal enough to shop outside of the limits of its ban on plastic grocery bags.

It seems, based on a new study by the National Center for Policy Analysis, that shoppers facing the inconvenience in Los Angeles County have for the last year been sneaking across the ban borders to shop.

Overall, sales at stores inside the Polyethylene Wall were down by 3.3 percent. Sales just outside the wall were up by 3.4 percent, according the survey of store managers in and out of Los Angeles County.

At nearly 80 percent of stores in the ban zone sales were off by nearly 6 percent. At 60 percent of the stores outside the zone sales were up by 9 percent.

Bag-ban managers in every store surveyed laid off at least one employee and staffing overall was down 10 percent, the study says. Employment at the outside stores was up, but by just 2.4 percent.

Add to that the amount of energy shoppers are expending to skirt the ban and you have what the Center’s study refers to as unintended consequences.

It might be good to establish at this point that National Center for Policy Analysis is a nonprofit organization in the business of questioning government regulation while promoting a competitive and entrepreneurial free market.

Not a likely candidate to be giving advice to a City Council that regularly ignored past warnings of  those unintended consequences and accepted as fact plastic bag cleanup costs that had been mistakenly inflated by 366 percent.

But having been prescient enough to make it a crime for stores to use plastic bags after March of 2013, it isn’t too late for the City Council to include penalties for people with the temerity to shop where they want to shop.

***

Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org or on Twitter at @marktxwatchdog.
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Photo of Plastic by flickr user mtsofan, used via a Creative Commons license.

 

Texas Watchdog article cited in Texas voter ID case against Attorney General Eric Holder
Wednesday, Jun 06, 2012, 11:10AM CST
By Steve Miller
signs

The state of Texas has introduced a Texas Watchdog article on voter fraud into its voter ID case against U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder.

The article, along with several others, is part of a response to a motion to compel filed by the defendant, which asks the court to compel production of documents by the state.

In a footnote on the Watchdog piece, the state writes:

Politiqueros, campaign workers who assist voters in filling out mail-in ballots and sometimes mail the ballot for the voter, play a controversial
role in south Texas elections.  See, e.g., Steve Miller, Politiquero Tradition Shapes Elections in South Texas, Texas Watchdog, Apr. 7, 2010 (Ex. 5).  Representative Aliseda has also acknowledged that he has not prosecuted in person voter impersonation cases. See Adryana Boyne, Interview with Rep. Jose Aliseda of the Hispanic Republican Conference, Texas GOP Vote, Apr. 29, 2011 (Ex. 6).

The lawsuit was filed after the Obama administration blocked implementation of the voter ID bill, which was passed in the statehouse last session.

In 2010 we delivered a series of articles on voter fraud in South Texas, which centered on mail-in ballots. Texas Watchdog documented, step-by-step, the process used to commit the fraud, in which paid vote harvesters coach voters to select certain candidates or collect ballots, then alter them.

We also wrote about how voter ID was more of a political issue from Washington, a Republican rallying cry rather than a practical solution to the very real problem of voter fraud in Texas.

During the state legislative session in Texas in 2009, “voter ID became code language,” Aaron Peña, a South Texas lawmaker told Texas Watchdog. “It was a Washington-driven plan. Not to demean the effort, but it did not come to fruition here in Texas."

Peña last session introduced a number of measures aimed at inhibiting vote harvesting, which went nowhere as the voter ID bill passed.

***
Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.

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Creative Commons License
Like this story? Then steal it. This report by Texas Watchdog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. That means bloggers, citizen-journalists, and journalists may republish the story on their sites with attribution and a link to Texas Watchdog. If you do re-use the story, e-mail news@texaswatchdog.org.

Woodlands voters who registered to motel indicted on voter fraud charges
Monday, Mar 12, 2012, 12:38PM CST
By Steve Miller
vote

Seven Woodlands men who used a Texas Watchdog story as the crux of their actions in hopes of unseating three local utility board incumbents have been indicted on voter fraud charges by the state Attorney General, the Courier of Montgomery County reports.

The seven in May 2010 checked into a hotel in the Woodlands Road Utility District, establishing themselves as “residents,” relying on published reports that ascertained that voter residence in the state of Texas is can be determined “by the voter,” according to Randall Dillard, a spokesman for the Texas Secretary of State's office. He was quoted in a Texas Watchdog story involving nine voters registered to a DEA building in north Tarrant County.

The Woodlands residents won, but were sued by the ousted board members, who prevailed in a court case in Montgomery County.

We later blogged about a Houston Chronicle piece on 14,000 voters in an RV park outside Houston who were registered to vote in Polk County, yet did not live there.

***
Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.

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Photo of money by flickr user athrasher, used via a Creative Commons

Texas Rep. Jose Aliseda seeks Senate sponsor for voter fraud bill, says 'we are making headway' on awareness of mail-in ballot fraud
Wednesday, May 18, 2011, 03:33PM CST
By Steve Miller
mailbox

We wrote Tuesday of the state of mail-in ballot voter fraud legislation, including a couple bills authored by state Rep. Jose Aliseda, R-Beeville.

One bill, House Bill 2449, passed the House 112-16 on Friday and now heads for the Senate, where it needs a sponsor.

The bill would make illegal possession of one mail-in ballot a single crime, with each additional ballot held constituting a separate crime. Under current law, a person could be holding several fraudulent ballots but be charged with a single crime.

Aliseda didn't get back to us by press time for our story that ran yesterday, but he sent along a note this morning: "I am still searching for a sponsor. ... There is a lack of understanding as to the mail-in ballot fraud problem, but we are making headway. If just a few [bills] pass, it will make a difference."

 

***

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


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Photo of a mailbox by flickr user Sean Loyless, used via a Creative Commons license.

Texas voter fraud bills face end of session, South Texas lawmaker remains optimistic
Tuesday, May 17, 2011, 04:21PM CST
By Steve Miller
Capitol

State Rep. Aaron Peña arrived in Austin for the 82nd Legislative Session ready to combat the pervasive practice of voter fraud in South Texas. Armed with a batch of bills addressing the problem, Peña’s endeavor was the first comprehensive effort to stem problems with the mail-in ballot process since state Rep. Steve Wolens, D-Dallas, pushed through a bill that increased legal penalties for voter fraud activities in 2003.

 

Peña, R-Edinburg, filed a series of bills addressing assisted voting crimes, and the fraudulent filing of another voter’s ballot. Texas Watchdog has documented this problem among voter assistants, or politiqueras as they are called in South Texas, who are paid by the ballot to harvest votes.


None of Peña's bills have made it to the House floor, and time is about out. But Peña is bullish on his chances.

Nicole PerezPEÑA

“These bills are not dead yet,” Peña said Tuesday. “I believe that there are still vehicles for them to find passage.”

He could attach them to other bills, a procedural move that would almost guarantee passage if connected to the right bill. 

 

But once in the Senate, he would have to find someone to carry them, a process his office is engaged in right now.

 

Among the bills that could see the light of day through that method:

  • House Bill 2051, which would require anyone assisting a voter at the polls to attest that he or she is not that voter’s employer or part of any group that employs the voter, is awaiting a House vote.
  • House Bill 2058, which would make it a criminal offense to fill out another person’s mail-in ballot application in the presence of the voter, other than as a legal witness, never made it to a House vote. Current law makes that a crime only in the presence of the applicant.

Some of Peña’s bills were clear misses, never garnering the support he needed. Among those:

  • House Bill 2057, which amended the penal code to include conspiracy to interfere with an election with other, existing crimes, never got a reading after its introduction.
  • House Bill 304, which would require anyone assisting a voter at the polls to provide a photo ID and to be a registered voter in that county.  It never made it out of committee.
  • House Bill 2059, which would make it a state jail crime, rather than the current class A misdemeanor, for a person to fail to return a voter registration application to the voter registrar. It never made it to committee.

Still, Peña said the session has been successful for him. He points to House Bill 2052, which forces county voting registrars to check their voter rolls each quarter for dead voters -- a problem Texas Watchdog has tracked -- rather than the vague current requirements of “periodically.” It has been approved by the House.

 

“Most of the bills I have wanted have passed,” Peña said. “Some of this stuff, like the dead voters, is just common sense stuff, and I trust both the Democrats and Republicans on the Senate side will do what’s right.”

 

Meanwhile, state Rep. Jose Aliseda, who also hails from South Texas, has had good luck with at least one major voter fraud bill.

 

House Bill 2449 passed the House 112-16 on Friday and heads for the Senate. The bill would make illegal possession of one mail-in ballot a single crime, with each additional ballot held constituting a separate crime. Under current law, a person could be holding several fraudulent ballots but be charged with a single crime.

 

In a March hearing, Aliseda, R-Beeville, explained his logic on the bill, saying “what we are trying to do is catch them in a scheme where they are perhaps deliberately trying to avoid the felony penalty by carrying less than 20 at a time. … I can see how someone could avoid prosecution for a felony by being careful of how many ballots a day they collect.”

 

Like Peña, Aliseda filed a number of voter fraud bills that went nowhere, ending up sitting in committee or getting through but having little chance of a full House vote.

 

House Bill 3448 would have made clearer the requirements for mail-in balloting, which some voters have abused by, for example, falsely claiming a disability. It never made it to the House floor.

 

Aliseda did not return two e-mails requesting comment.

 

Little was done on the Senate side, but two bills addressing the particulars of voter fraud passed. It's not clear whether the proposals will see a House vote.

 

Vote harvesters use the records of requests for mail-in ballots in deciding which voters to target. The list of often elderly or infirm applicants becomes a map for their door-to-door work.

 

Aimed at this problem is Senate Bill  997, which would make a mail-in ballot application unavailable to the general public until one day after the election. The bill, by state Sen. Florence Shapiro, R-Plano, sailed through the Senate in early April, 31-0.

 

Senate Bill 1302 would make it a Class A misdemeanor to pay people based on the number of people they assisted to vote, to present a person with a quota of voters to assist in order to be paid, or to accept money to assist people to vote. The bill, authored by Sen. Bob Deuell, R-Mesquite, passed the Senate last month.

 

***

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


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Photo of Texas state Capitol by flickr user The Brit_2, used via a Creative Commons license.

Will Wayne Dolcefino's investigative reports affect Kemah mayoral election? Featured video
Tuesday, Apr 26, 2011, 10:52AM CST
By Jennifer Peebles
kemah

It's election season in the Houston seaside suburb of Kemah, and you probably already guessed what people are talking about: Wayne Dolcefino's series of reports on the activities of Mayor Matt Wiggins.

First, there were the questions about whether the mayor, a developer, was ripping off people with storm-damaged houses to try to get hold of their property. 

Then there were the questions about whether the mayor's businesses and properties have the proper permits

And most recently, Dolcefino reported that Wiggins is "delinquent on taxes on dozens of properties, even some in his town."

Ouch. 

Wiggins has at least one opponent in the coming election:

"If there is an accident, there will be no place for any part of the city of Kemah to hide from the shame that occurred," mayoral candidate Bob Cummins said. 

***

Spotted a good video on Texas government or politics, watchdog journalism or government accountability or transparency? Shoot a note to jennifer@texaswatchdog.org

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Kemah Boardwalk Ferris wheel photo by flickr user troubledog, used under a Creative Commons license.

Hidalgo County election commissioners pushing back against pervasive voter fraud
Monday, Apr 18, 2011, 05:32PM CST
By Steve Miller
vote

Voters in Hidalgo County would have to meet stricter requirements to have someone assist them at the polls under a move election commissioners are pushing to stem voter fraud in this South Texas county were the crime has been pervasive.

 

A story in The Monitor reports that the Hidalgo County Elections Commission has voted to push forward with the idea, according to County Judge Ramon Garcia.

 

Under the order:


“…The elections judge would ask the voter “Do you have a physical disability that renders you unable to write or see? Are you unable to read the language in which the ballot is written?” Garcia said.  Elections judges, however, could not ask additional questions.

If the voter answered no, admitting that he or she does not fit the requirements for assistance, then the elections judge would have the voter use a provisional ballot so he or she could be identified for prosecution if need be…”


Election law allows for assistance at the polls in the case of a voter who cannot see or read the language of the ballot. Most parts of Texas have bilingual programs for elections, printing ballots in English and Spanish as well as other languages where needed.


Hildalgo County District Attorney René Guerra told the newspaper that voter fraud is difficult to police and encouraged anyone looking at the issue to take it up with a state legislator.

 

He also said the Elections Commission and the Hidalgo County Commissioners Court do not have the power to change voting policy and that they should focus on working with the state legislature to change voter assistance laws altogether.


State Rep. Aaron Peña, R-Edinburg, has introduced several measures he hopes will combat voter fraud this session in Austin.

 

Among them is House Bill 2051, which changes the state Election Code to ensure that someone assisting a voter is not that voter’s employer, in order to stem possible influence on a vote.  Under the bill, an assistant would be required to assert under oath that he or she is not an employer or agent of the employer before assisting the voter.

 

Another Peña bill,  House Bill 304,  requires the person providing the assistance to show a photo ID and to be a registered voter of that county. 

 

Both bills are in committee.

 

***

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


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Photo of 'Vote' by flickr user PropagandaTimes, used via a Creative Commons license.

Bills to curb mail-in ballot fraud get hearing; absentee ballot fraud 'largest growing fraud' in Texas: Rep. Aaron Peña
Tuesday, Mar 29, 2011, 02:22PM CST
By Steve Miller
mailbox

The House Elections Committee on Monday heard bills addressing absentee ballot fraud, measures aimed at reforming the mail-in ballot process in the state and making it tougher for individuals to alter election results.

 

“Assisted voter fraud is the largest growing fraud that we have,” state Rep. Aaron Peña, R-Edinburg, told the committee. “It’s an outgrowth of the old boss system, and it has never really stopped.”

 

Peña has filed more than two dozens bills addressing voting laws, noting that the work of vote harvesters known as politiqueras is endemic to his South Texas region.

 

The committee heard his House Bill 2051, which would change the state election code to ensure that someone assisting a voter is not that voter’s employer, in order to stem possible influence on a vote. Under the bill, an assistant would be required to assert under oath that he or she is not an employer or agent of the employer before assisting the voter.

 

Another bill would make it easier for law enforcement to pursue felony charges for possessing ballots. Vote harvesters often take the ballots of those they have assisted to the post office.

 

Current law makes it a misdemeanor to possess 10 to 19 ballots, a felony to possess 20 or more. House Bill 2449, filed by Rep. Jose Aliseda, would allow authorities to consider ballot possession over the course of days to boost the penalty, rather than doling out smaller charges piecemeal.

Jose AlisedaALISEDA

“Just so you understand, these people, especially in South Texas, are often getting paid to collect these mail-in ballots,” Aliseda, R-Beeville, told the committee. “What we are trying to do is catch them in a scheme where they are perhaps deliberately trying to avoid the felony penalty by carrying less than 20 at a time. ... I can see how someone could avoid prosecution for a felony by being careful of how many ballots a day they collect.”

He said collecting ballots is enabled by county clerks, post office employees and even election administrators in some counties, who work with vote harvesters.

 

“Most of this is done in the homes of people 65 and older, people that you would think are competent but they are getting help from these vote harvesters in order to, quote, cast the right ballot," Aliseda said.

Aaron PenaPEÑA

Peña’s House Bill 2058 would make it a crime for someone to complete a mail-in ballot application for another without signing the application as an assistant, regardless of whether that work is done in the presence of the voter or not. Current law does not require that witness signature on the application, though it does on the ballot itself.

“People are not signing the application when they are helping, and there is no limit on how many people you can assist,” said Special Assistant U.S. Attorney David Glicker of the Texas Attorney General's Office, who attended Monday’s hearing as a witness. 

 

Once vote harvesters learn who is getting a mail-in ballot, they go to that person, who is often elderly or infirm, and ask if they can help them prepare their ballot.

 

In some cases, advocates for tougher laws say, a ballot is simply removed from the mail before it reaches the voter, with the vote harvester filling it out.

 

Also on Monday, a Senate bill that would make a mail-in ballot application unavailable to the general public until one day after the election moved closer to passage.

 

Senate Bill 997, authored by state Sen. Florence Shapiro, R-Plano, passed the Senate State Affairs Committee, 8-0, and next moves to the full Senate. 

Election administrators in South Texas for years have asked Austin for help in controlling the politiqueras, meeting separately last year to plan a strategy to address lawmakers. 

It worked, as officials like Peña and Shapiro have responded. But is it enough?

 

"These bills all touch on mail-in ballot fraud, but so far it's just bits and pieces," said Rudy Montalvo, election administrator in Starr County in South

 

Texas and a legislative liaison for the Texas Association of Elections Administrators. "So many of these bills, they all touch on part of the problem, which is fine. This is a much better effort, though, than in previous years, when there was no effort at all."

 

A year ago, Montalvo said that Austin doesn't care about the voter fraud problem in South Texas.

 

"Now, I'm happy someone is talking about it," he said. "And I'll take anything I can get."

 

More bills will be heard next week, Peña said.

 

Some of those bills would toughen penalties, while others would make it easer to detect patterns of abuse of the voting system and investigate those abuses.

 

While he does not yet have an ally in the Senate, Peña said he expects to be able to recruit a sponsor.

 

“I don’t know that I can get re-elected after this,” Peña said. “But this is what has to be done.”

 

Texas Watchdog has documented the problem of mail-in ballot fraud in South Texas. Here are some of the stories:

***

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


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Photo of a mailbox by flickr user cjc4454, used via a Creative Commons license.

Mesquite woman lied about address to cast ballot for her uncle, JP Carlos Medrano: Voter fraud indictment
Tuesday, Mar 29, 2011, 10:44AM CST
By Steve Miller
vote here

File this under: Was it worth it?

 

A Mesquite woman has been indicted on one count of illegal voting in the March 2010 Dallas County justice of the peace contest. Her uncle was a candidate.

 

Raquel Medrano, 21, is accused of falsifying the address on her voter registration application by using that of a relative in the city of Dallas. The charge is a 3rd-degree felony and stems from her vote for Carlos Medrano in the Democratic primary last year. Medrano defeated incumbent Luis Sepulveda, who sued the county and Medrano after losing the election by 361 votes

 

The state Attorney General’s office has been conducting an investigation into the election. The office began its investigation at the behest of the secretary of state's office. According to the Dallas Morning News, writing last year:

In an April 20 letter, the secretary of state office's elections director, Ann McGeehan, asked the attorney general for help, citing evidence of nine possible crimes. They included illegal voting, obstructing a poll watcher, unlawfully assisting a voter and providing false information on a ballot application.

Sepulveda testified on Monday at a hearing of the state House Elections Committee on a number of bills regarding mail-in ballot fraud. He cited the race that cost him his office.

 

"There were 1,800 mail-in ballot applications in that race, and 964 came back,” Sepulveda said. “That means almost 800 applications disappeared."

Raquel MedranoMEDRANO

He said that vote harvesters, people paid by candidates or parties to get votes, worked the election and caused his defeat.

“I spoke to vote harvesters,” Sepulveda said. “They get $12 to $15 a ballot from who they work for. … The only thing to make them stop is to catch them.”

 

Raquel Medrano turned herself in to the Rockwall County Jail where she was booked and released on a $10,000 personal recognizance bond, the AG's office said.

 

***

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


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Photo of 'Vote here' signs by flickr user lakelandlocal, used via a Creative Commons license.

Tougher penalties for mail-in ballot fraud up for debate Monday in Texas House committee
Monday, Mar 28, 2011, 12:48PM CST
By Steve Miller
mailboxes

Political workers found guilty of mail-in ballot fraud would face harsher punishment under bills proposed by Rep. Aaron Peña, R-Edinburg, who is targeting the practice with more than two dozen bills, including several set for debate today in the House Elections Committee.

Stemming mail-in fraud -- an old and entrenched practice in South Texas that is arguably the most prevalent form of voter fraud in Texas -- doesn't have the political gleam of the recently passed voter ID legislation. But given the Republican majority in both chambers, Peña is optimistic at least a few of his measures will pass.

 

“Democrats will not compromise in this, and I know that because I was one,” he said. Peña changed his party affiliation shortly before the legislative session, and prior to that was known as a conservative-tilting Democrat.

 

“They benefit from the politiquera system in South Texas. They need it to be competitive in certain districts,” Peña said, referencing the ballot harvesters known as politiqueras. “People down here are addicted to the system."

Aaron PenaPEÑA

Peña has introduced 25 bills that touch on mail-in, absentee balloting. One, House Bill 2585, would increase penalties for illegally possessing ballots. Another, House Bill 2586, would raise the penalty for lying on a mail-in ballot application from a misdemeanor to a felony.

“These bills are aimed at enhancing penalties,” Peña said. “There is just no doubt that this activity is going on, and it needs a law to stop it.”

 

Peña is supported by a cadre of Republicans, and he said he expects much the same resistance from Democrats that was heard during the heated and partisan voter ID debate. A newly created House select committee, voter identification and voter fraud, is composed of three Democrats and six Republicans. 

 

On the Senate side, Sen. Florence Shapiro, R-Plano, has introduced Senate Bill 997, which would prohibit anyone from inspecting mail-in ballot applications until after election day. Under current law, those applications are pored over by politiqueras, who visit the homes of those on the list under the auspices of assisting voters. The workers may pressure voters into casting ballots for the worker's candidates or fill out the ballot themselves to favor their candidates.

 

Shapiro's bill has been in committee since March 21. No hearing is scheduled. Shapiro did not return a call placed on Sunday.

 

During debate of the voter ID bill, Democrats reasoned that since mail-in ballot fraud was more prevalent in Texas, a policy aimed at in-person voting was misguided.

 

"If voter fraud is your purpose, why not a photo requirement for mail-in ballots?" state Sen, Rodney Ellis, D-Houston, asked during voter ID discussion in January. "Wouldn't you say there is more room for fraud with mail-in ballots?... Would you concede that there is more potential for mail-in ballot fraud than with someone showing up?"

 

Sen, Royce West, D-Dallas, also evoked absentee fraud during the debate, and noted the absence of legislation addressing that from the legislature as a whole.

 

“We’ve done nothing on that,” West said.

 

It’s been eight years since House Bill 54, the last far-reaching change in the law regarding absentee ballots. The law set out penalties for appropriating ballots and otherwise abusing the mail-in voter process.

 

Former state Rep. Steve Wolens, a Dallas Democrat, was its architect.

 

Peña voted for it then, as a Democrat.

 

“It was great legislation that even had bipartisan support," Peña said. And referring to Rep. Joe Pickett, the sole House Democrat to support voter ID, he said, "I think our friend from El Paso, on the voter ID measure, shows that stopping voter fraud is something everyone stands behind.”

 

***

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


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Photo of money by flickr user ms sdb, used via a Creative Commons license.

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Houston Home Listing Photo of the Day: The Vault 14759 Oak Bend Dr. [HAR] … Read...
Update:2 years 9 months
Swamplot
Tweets
Karen Townsend | 7 years 10 months
"Patrick F. Kennedy is a career foreign service officer" - http://t.co/GOrCe0IS
Peter Corbett ✈ | 7 years 10 months
I'm at McCarran International Airport (LAS) w/ @almacy http://t.co/KvmId07i
KERA Public Media | 7 years 10 months
TONIGHT at 7pm on KERA TV: Presidential Debate: Learn more at PBS NewsHour. http://t.co/Z9kYdun8
PBS MediaShift | 7 years 10 months
Tech Snafus Make Bill O'Reilly/Jon Stewart 'Rumble' More of a Stumble http://t.co/4OfeBlrG (@kegill | @pbsmediashift) #rumble2012
Will Sullivan | 7 years 10 months
Great addition, been burned too much by bad subs. "Google Play Announces Free Trials For In-App Subscription Services" http://t.co/TOLgRVak
TxDOT | 7 years 10 months
I-35W/North Tarrant Express #constantcontact http://t.co/QDzrQumu
keyetv | 7 years 10 months
Serial shotgun robbers suspects arrested. http://t.co/ka8T4U9B
Karen Townsend | 7 years 10 months
Aren't State Dept career people suppose to be non-partisan? Not the political appointees, the career people. #Libya
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