in Houston, Texas
Bid for secrecy? Travis County hospital district sets up nonprofit
Monday, Jan 07, 2013, 11:38AM CST
By Mark Lisheron
hand

Having endured those galling laws requiring tax increases be voted on in public, the Travis County hospital district would like to get down to the business of spending your $54 million without your help, thank you.

The district might have preferred not to tell you how they plan to do it had the Austin American-Statesman not made its usual, irksome inquiries.

You see, rather than distribute your property tax increase and as much as $76 million more in matching federal tax money a year through its own board, subject to the nettlesome state Open Meetings Act, the district established a nonprofit Central Health Collaborative, the Statesman is reporting.

Such a nonprofit is not subject to the Open Meetings Act because it isn’t a government body, according to Beth Devery, who offered her opinion as an attorney for the taxpayer-supported government body known as Travis County.

Devery is also the lawyer for the Central Health Collaborative.

Travis County taxpayers might not have gotten mixed up in all this secret medical business had county voters in November not handily passed Proposition 1.

Ostensibly a referendum on establishing a new medical school for the University of Texas in Austin, voters also were agreeing to nearly triple for the average homeowner taxes to support health care for the indigent in 2014.

That tax increase makes Travis County eligible for as much as $76 million a year in more-than-matching federal funds.

This funding is a small tributary to a roiling pool of medical and medical school funding with sources that had to be wrenched out of the University of Texas System by open records requests this past summer.

Creating and running the medical school is estimated to cost $4.1 billion in the first 12 years. The university system expected $420 million of that total to come from Central Health Collaborative.

The Collaborative is supposed to assist Seton Healthcare Family, the local hospital group pledging $1.9 billion over 12 years for the medical school, in finding a location for a new teaching hospital. And later, enter into a contract for health care services through the medical school.

Just how the Collaborative will spend your money might or might not be a matter of public record. The Collaborative hasn’t yet decided whether to hold its meetings in public or in secret, Christie Garbe, vice president of planning and communications, told the Statesman.

The hospital district board spent almost half of its meeting time last year in secret, the paper reports.

Joseph Larsen, a Houston lawyer and Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas board member, told the Statesman the nonprofit would be better off operating more publicly.

Buck Wood, an Austin lawyer who worked on the the current open meetings laws when they were drafted in the 1970s, said had he known the Collaborative’s meetings would be secret he would not have voted for Proposition 1.

“We are basically contracting away the right to information that the public ought to have,” Wood told the paper. “If you’re spending that kind of money, we want to know everything about it.”

***
Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org or on Twitter at @marktxwatchdog.

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Photo by flickr user Jose Goulao, used via a Creative Commons license.

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How tight is Houston's drainage tax 'lock box'? Bike trails funded by Rebuild Houston money for streets and drainage
Thursday, Oct 13, 2011, 01:28PM CST
By Steve Miller
cycling trails

It was passed by Houston voters as a tax to address the city’s decrepit drainage system and Third World streets. But $857,000 of the new Proposition 1 fund --- which Mayor Annise Parker pitched as a "lock box that can only be spent for street and drainage improvements" --- is slated for hike and bike trails.

The money will pay for "design, acquisition and construction" of trails as part of an overall plan to provide "an alternate route of travel for bicyclists and/or hikers away from street traffic," according to the city's latest capital improvement plan.


Shown the budget item, a chief proponent of Proposition 1 was baffled.

 

“The money was not supposed to go for hike and bike trails,” said Bob Jones, part of the successful Renew Houston effort. “This is not the intention for the money that we voted on.”

 

Voters approved Prop 1 in November by a 51 to 49 percent marginThe fund, also known as Rebuild Houston, draws from four sources: drainage fees on property owners, developer impact fees, property taxes, and government grants.

 

The city’s infrastructure has for decades groaned under increased use and been put on the back burner by politicians. As far back as 1989, road funds were cut in favor of the more politically-appealing police and fire staff increases. More recently, the city's overall budget increased by more than half in the six years to 2010, and critics of Prop 1 questioned why the city needed a new revenue stream.


“With a fee and placing that in the city charter, we would be prohibited from spending this money on anything other than streets and drainage," Parker promised in an interview on the eve of the vote. "In an age of teabaggers and activism, this is forcing compliance from government.”

 

Annise ParkerAnnise Parker

Parker urged voters to back the plan in an opinion piece in the Houston Chronicle:

“Proposition 1 mandates a responsible pay-as-you-go plan. For the first time in Houston's history there would be a dedicated income stream - a lock box - that can only be spent for street and drainage improvements.

"Your vote would prohibit us from diverting these dollars for any other projects - with no exceptions. And your vote would mean the city could repair, replace or upgrade every street in Houston that is past its useful life."

Opponents of Prop 1 maintained that the money would be diverted for other purposes as part of the city’s overall infrastructure budget rather than being kept in the promised lockbox.


“This is what we’ve been afraid of,” said Bruce Hotze, a Houston businessman and Prop 1 critic. Unlike individual project bond votes, “this is unknown what the projects are going to be when you vote. It’s outrageous they would spend this money on a bike trail when they told us it was going for drainage and street repair."

 

Parker declined through a spokeswoman to comment.


The city's Public Works department acknowledged the hike-and-bike program is to receive Rebuild Houston money -- but not via the drainage tax component. The entire Rebuild Houston program is pegged by city charter for "Houston's drainage and streets."

 

The trails program "will not receive any funding from the drainage fee component," Roberto Medina, senior staff analyst at the department, said via e-mail, adding assurances from a planning person who heads hike and bike trail plans.

 

"Yes, it is listed as (Dedicated Drainage and Street Renewal) funding, but there are four components to that fund," Medina said. "We are well aware that it is not a clear way of identifying how a project is going to get funded, and it would have been nice for it to be more specific."

 

The city touts 95 miles of city-operated hike and bike trails and lists several extensions that are underway on its website. The capital plan does not say exactly where the trail improvements will be located, referring to a separate city bikeway masterplan.

 

The trails project was projected to cost $40 million over six years, with almost $28 million from the state Department of Transportation, according to a capital plan for 2009-14. The most recent plan, for 2012-16, calls for additional design work this year and a six-year cost of $30.9 million, with a Metro projects fund making up the largest single share at more than $7.8 million.

 

The drainage fee, which backers projected would cost an average Houston homeowner with a 5,000-square-foot lot and a 2,500-square-foot home about $5 a month, was discovered to have a heavier impact when the bills went out, and the mayor quickly amended the fee to meet the projections.

 

Texas Watchdog contacted several supporters of Prop 1 to weigh in on this story. Jack P. Miller, president of RG Miller Engineers, and Christina Lindsay, executive director of the Houston Council of Engineering Companies, did not return calls. A person answering the phone at the home of Jeff Ross, of Pate Engineers, hung up on this reporter.


The Rebuild Houston Oversight Committee, which includes Ross, meets at 10 a.m. every fourth Tuesday in the Mayor’s Conference Room at City Hall.

 

The city's plans for street improvements are here. For drainage, they are here. Projects funded in part with Rebuild Houston money are marked with "DDSRF" line items, short for the city's Dedicated Drainage and Street Renewal Fund. A guide that details the fund is here.

 

***

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


Keep up with all the latest news from Texas Watchdog. Fan our page on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and Scribd, and fan us on YouTube. Join our network on de.licio.us, and put our RSS feeds in your newsreader. We're also on MySpaceDiggFriendFeed, and tumblr.

Photo from collection "Cycling at Memorial Park" by flickr user Daniesq, used via a Creative Commons license.

Creative Commons License
Like this story? Then steal it. This report by Texas Watchdog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. That means bloggers, citizen-journalists, and journalists may republish the story on their sites with attribution and a link to Texas Watchdog. If you do re-use the story, we'd love to hear about it. E-mail news@texaswatchdog.org.

Aid group to pay more in city of Houston drainage fees than Chase Tower
Friday, Jul 29, 2011, 09:18AM CST
By Lee Ann O'Neal
money

A West Houston nonprofit will pay more in city of Houston drainage fees than the JPMorgan Chase Tower -- the tallest skyscraper in Texas.
 
The West Houston Assistance Ministries’ bill comes to $210 per month, $55 more than the 75-story downtown Chase building will owe, a joint investigation by Texas Watchdog and the InFocus team at KTRK ABC 13 found.
 
The ministries group says it unsuccessfully appealed the fee to the city and will be forced to dip into its operating fund -- which supports rental aid, a food pantry, and job search assistance -- to pay the bill.

“It's going to have to take away from something, you know, because it's not in the budget," Shirley Downing, executive director of the West Houston Assistance Ministries, told KTRK.
 
The city sent the first drainage bills out this month, part of an $8 billion, 20-year program to stem flooding passed by the voters last fall. Property owners pay based on whether the land is residential, whether it has a curb-and-gutter or open-ditch drainage system, and the square footage of driveways, rooftops and other surfaces that contribute to stormwater runoff. A bill for a home with 4,800 square feet of such hard surfaces would come to between $98.80 and $121.60 annually, or up to $10.13 a month.
 
The city told KTRK the intent of the program is to bill property owners based on their impact on the drainage system, not on their property’s purpose. This despite the fact that the City Council in April exempted schools, churches and most county government properties from the fee.
 
So who pays, and who doesn’t? Texas Watchdog and KTRK examined the city’s list of drainage bills and found other eyebrow-raising tidbits. View a video report below, and check out a companion report here -- including this map of the top 10 drainage bills owed by the city itself. You can also download or search the data here.

***
Contact Lee Ann O’Neal at 713-980-9777 or leeann@texaswatchdog.org.

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Photo of money by flickr user Tracy 0, used via a Creative Commons license.
Feeling soaked by the Houston drainage fee? Look at the city's database and the Texas Watchdog/ABC 13 investigation
Wednesday, Jul 27, 2011, 10:19PM CST
By Lee Ann O'Neal
flooding

A massive new drainage program has drawn criticism from Houston residents, who worry  the implementation of a new fee has been slipshod or worse.

“It’s a bad science experiment,” west side Houston resident Clyde Bryan told the InFocus team at KTRK ABC 13, who partnered with Texas Watchdog on an investigation into the drainage fee, to be used for projects to stem flooding. Bryan said the drainage map for his street has missing houses and driveways, and that he worries the city is not accurately figuring the fee.
 
But city officials defend the program, and Mayor Annise Parker blamed any problems on how quickly the fee has been implemented. Property owners received the first bills this month.
 
“We are building a car while driving it,” Parker told KTRK. “This is light speed for a government entity to implement something this complicated this fast.”
 
Voters approved the fee last November, but politics and math problems have mired its implementation. The program was sold as one without any exceptions, but the City Council later exempted churches and schools. Parker pitched the referendum with the promise of an average homeowner bill of $5 a month, but the actual bills turned out higher, and the city ratcheted down the rate structure to compensate.
 
But the problems don’t end there. View a video report from the InFocus team at KTRK ABC 13 here, and access the drainage fee data below.
 
Texas Watchdog has posted the data as a searchable database (below) and also in two (large) downloadable Excel files --- broken into records where all information was released (about 42 MB) and a file with records for accountholders who had requested confidentiality of identifying information (about 6 MB). The downloadable files are the raw data we obtained from the city of Houston in mid-June -- see this readme file. The data accessed in the searchable database are a combination of the city's records and a few fields calculated by Texas Watchdog.
 
Some records may have changed as the city made corrections and updates since we obtained the data. To see the most up-to-date bills, please refer to the city's website.

Tips for Using the Searchable Database:
  • You can search on any combination of fields, for example, just by street name, or by street name and name on account, etc. The search engine will return results that meet all of the criteria you select.
  • In the NAME ON ACCOUNT field, search by last name, or last then first names or company name. So you could search for Smith or Smith Harry or ABC Corp. A search for Smith Harry will return any records where the name on the account contains the phrase Smith Harry.
  • In the STREET NAME field, search by the base street name --- Main or Travis--- leaving off any prefixes or suffixes --- East or Blvd. A search for Harrisburg will return any records where the address contains the word Harrisburg.
  • In the ZIP CODE field, search by the 5-digit zip code. A search for 77002 will return all records where the five-digit zip code is exactly 77002.
  • If you can't find the record you're looking for, it may be that that information has been held confidential by the accountholder, allowable under Texas law. About 140,000 of the more than 550,000 accounts in the database fell into this confidential category.
Questions? Need help searching for something in particular? E-mail us at leeann@texaswatchdog.org or call 713-980-9777.
 
Online Database by Caspio
Click here to load this Caspio Online Database.
 
Guide to the Results:
  • OriginalImpervArea - City's estimate of the impervious surface area at this address (in square feet).
  • OriginalAnnualChrg - City's original estimate of the annual bill due (before the 1,000-square-foot adjustment).
  • EstNewImpervArea - Texas Watchdog's estimate of the new impervious surface area, used to figure bills, based on the city's decision to lower all property owners' bills by an amount equal to what was due on the first 1,000 square feet of impervious surface area. Negative numbers mean that the property had less than 1,000 square feet of impervious area to begin with, and so our estimate is that the accountholder will not owe a fee.
  • EstAdjustedAnnual - Texas Watchdog's estimate of the new annual bill due (after the 1,000-square-foot adjustment). If this figure is negative (indicated by a number in parentheses), our estimate is that the accountholder will not owe a fee.
  • DrainageClass - Type of drainage system for the property, which is one factor in how the city calculates the bill.
  • LandArea - Total area of the property (in square feet).
  • SqFtRate - The city is levying the fee based on two rates, $0.032 per square foot of impervious surface area and $0.026 per square foot. The higher rate applies to nonresidential properties and residential properties with a curb and gutter drainage system. The lower rate applies to residential properties with an open ditch drainage system.

***
Contact Lee Ann O'Neal at 713-980-9777 or leeann@texaswatchdog.org

Keep up with all the latest news from Texas Watchdog. Fan our page on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and Scribd, and fan us on YouTube. Join our network on de.licio.us, and put our RSS feeds in your newsreader. We're also on MySpaceDiggFriendFeed, and tumblr.

Photo of "Houston Flooding' by Flickr user Dave77459, used via a Creative Commons license.

Houston Mayor Annise Parker lowers drainage fee
Friday, Jun 17, 2011, 07:55AM CST
By Kevin Lee
City Hall

Property owners will get some relief from the drainage utility bills the city begins distributing next month.

Houston Mayor Annise Parker announced Thursday the city will reduce the drainage fees for all properties in Houston and that the median monthly fee for homeowners will be between $5 and $6.

“Individual fees may vary,” Parker said. “I keep saying that because I’ve been burned a little bit. But this is the right thing to do. We want to make it right to the voters.”

While campaigning for the drainage fee, Parker said the average homeowner’s bill would be about $5 per month. But earlier this month, Parker drew the ire of property owners when she acknowledged that the estimate was off, with the actual average around $8.25 per month.

The fee is calculated based on the amount of square footage of “impervious surface” on a property -- driveways, covered patios, or anything else that blocks absorption of water. The city will reduce the fee by subtracting 1,000 square feet from the amount of impervious surface used to calculate the bill for each property.

Parker said the changes will be reflected in the bills Houston property owners will start receiving in July. She said the change would not require City Council action and that she intends to keep the reduction in place for the remainder of her administration.

The system used to calculate the drainage fees has been criticized as imprecise. In some cases, the square footage of impervious surface included shrubbery and shadows from trees.

“We use satellite imagery, and we had a very short timeline to implement this from the time the voters passed it to the end of this month,” Parker said. “We acknowledge that it’s an imperfect tool, and we are refining it as well as we can, but voters have up to six months to come to us and say, ‘This is the actual impervious surface in my property.’”

Parker was referring to the timeframe for property owners to appeal their bills, which she said the city has extended through the end of the year.

The drainage fee was approved by voters last year as a way to raise funds for a 20-year, $8 billion program to fix the city’s drainage system. It was backed heavily by engineering firms that have done business with the city.

Read more at blogHouston, KPRC Channel 2 and the Houston Chronicle.
 
***
Contact Kevin Lee at 713-228-3733 or kevin@texaswatchdog.org.

Keep up with all the latest news from Texas Watchdog. Fan our page on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and Scribd, and fan us on YouTube. Join our network on de.licio.us, and put our RSS feeds in your newsreader. We're also on MySpace, Digg, FriendFeed, and tumblr.

Photo of Houston City Hall by flickr user J Jackson Photography, used via a Creative Commons license.
Houston Mayor Annise Parker: City should bring drainage fees down to average of $5 a month, actual bills higher than expected
Wednesday, Jun 08, 2011, 12:06PM CST
By Kevin Lee
money clip

It's what a lot of Houston homeowners already suspected: The actual drainage tax bills set to start coming due next month are higher than the $5 a month average advertised to voters by Mayor Annise Parker and others.

The Houston Chronicle reports that Parker now says the average estimate of $5 a month she used to sell voters on the fee was wrong. The mayor revised that estimate on Tuesday to an average of $8.25 per month, a 65 percent increase.

The Chronicle says Parker left open the option of lowering the monthly drainage fee to bring the average down to $5.

"The typical example we used may have given the wrong impression to the voters and to Council," Parker said. "I'm going to lay out to Council ways to bring (the rate) it down. I think we probably ought to do that, but Council will need to do this with me."

The mayor acknowledged that lowering homeowners’ bills would leave the city up to $12 million short of what the proposition calls for in its first year. Parker suggested the city could borrow money to cover the difference.

Houston voters approved the drainage fee last November by a slim margin. Proposition 1 was backed heavily by engineers who already contract with the city and stand to benefit from the new projects. The proceeds from the $8 billion program are to be used to repair the city’s drainage system, which floods regularly.

Parker has a vested interest in keeping drainage fees low. Texas Watchdog reported in May that Parker herself would have to pay $331 annually on her two properties, with both bills coming in higher than the $5-a-month average.

The fee is calculated based on the amount of square footage of “impervious surface” on a property -- driveways, covered patios, or anything else that blocks absorption of water.

The city has implemented an online system for property owners to estimate their drainage fee, but blogHouston has questioned whether owners can rely on that system. In May, the site was among the first in a growing chorus of voices calling the bills into question:

The estimates seem to be based on Google satellite imagery that was never designed for the purpose. In my case, large roof overhangs, shadows from trees, and shrubs all managed to get assessed as impervious surface for tax purposes (and a small portion of driveway was left out), which means I will have to take time to do a little measuring this weekend, pull up some property sketches I have, and submit materials to city bureaucrats for a correction. And hope all goes well.

***
Contact Kevin Lee at 713-228-3733 or news@texaswatchdog.org.

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Photo of money clip by flickr user financialfellow1, used via a Creative Commons license.

City appeals records request for investigation docs into Houston City Councilman Stephen Costello, who was cleared of any wrongdoing or conflict of interest
Wednesday, Apr 20, 2011, 01:01PM CST
By Steve Miller
Houston City Hall

A citizen’s request for information relating to city contracts held by Houston City Councilman Stephen Costello has been referred to the state Attorney General’s office.

 

The April 4 request from David Welch, a Houston pastor, seeks documents and communications relating to the recent inspector general's investigation of Costello for “potential conflicts of interest or violations of the city charter.”

 

Costello was cleared of any wrongdoing in March.

 

City Attorney David Feldman said there have been a number of investigations conducted by the office of the inspector general, some involving city employees. But in terms of what is public record in both sustained and unsustained allegations, “we’re still looking for that middle ground, that happy medium,” Feldman said. “Maybe the attorney general will help us in that regard.”

The notice of appeal from the city to the AG’s office cites a broad section of Texas Government Code, which the city will break down in a subsequent filing.

 

Costello and his office did not respond to e-mails.

 

Welch is part of a group of critics of the city’s voter-approved Proposition 1 measure, which levies a tax on residents and businesses for road and infrastructure improvements. The measure was approved in November and will generate $125 million a year. The tax is set to be levied beginning in July.


Foes of the measure pointed to its strong financial backing from engineers, including Costello, and the possibility they could benefit from passage of Prop 1, referred to by proponents as Renew Houston.

 

***

Editor's Note: This post was updated at 6:35 p.m. April 20 to include comments from City Attorney David Feldman.


Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


Keep up with all the latest news from Texas Watchdog. Fan our page on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and Scribd, and fan us on YouTube. Join our network on de.licio.us, and put our RSS feeds in your newsreader. We're also on MySpaceDiggFriendFeedand tumblr.


Photo of Houston City Hall by flickr user eschipul, used via a Creative Commons license.

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Update:2 years 8 months
Unca Darrell
FEBRUARY 27 / Eric Hoffer on . . . . . . baby boomers and alienated intellectuals. "SCRATCH AN INTELLECTUAL, and you find a would-be aristocrat who loathes the sight, the...
Update:2 years 8 months
Unca Darrell
2017 Project: January “Progress” There are two different ways to interpret my 2017 project: that it's a way more complicated New Years Resolution, or that it is essentially...
Update:2 years 9 months
Greg's Opinion
Ted Cruz's first senate term in a nutshell The National Review's Tim Alberta switched to Politico, and one of his opening pieces put Ted Cruz's first term in a nutshell It...
Update:2 years 9 months
Rick Perry vs The World
Andrea Parquet-Taylor named KTVT CBS 11 news director Former KHOU 11 assistant news director Andrea Parquet-Taylor named Vice President, News Director for KTVT CBS 11 Andrea...
Update:2 years 9 months
Mike McGuff
VIDEO: KPRC 2 10pm newscast (1-24-99) ...
Update:2 years 9 months
Mike McGuff
Democrats actually thought Wendy Davis was a serious candidate? Hat tip to Willisms: VIDEO- Wendy Davis being Wendy Davis: https://t.co/SHq3ACGVDJ #txlege— Will Franklin (@WILLisms) January 24,...
Update:2 years 9 months
Rick Perry vs The World
Luke Bryan to sing National Anthem as part of Super Bowl LI on FOX ​ Country music superstar LUKE BRYAN will sing the National Anthem as part of Super Bowl LI pregame festivities at NRG Stadium in Houston...
Update:2 years 9 months
Mike McGuff
Tweets
Karen Townsend | 7 years 5 months
"Patrick F. Kennedy is a career foreign service officer" - http://t.co/GOrCe0IS
Peter Corbett ✈ | 7 years 5 months
I'm at McCarran International Airport (LAS) w/ @almacy http://t.co/KvmId07i
KERA Public Media | 7 years 5 months
TONIGHT at 7pm on KERA TV: Presidential Debate: Learn more at PBS NewsHour. http://t.co/Z9kYdun8
PBS MediaShift | 7 years 5 months
Tech Snafus Make Bill O'Reilly/Jon Stewart 'Rumble' More of a Stumble http://t.co/4OfeBlrG (@kegill | @pbsmediashift) #rumble2012
Will Sullivan | 7 years 5 months
Great addition, been burned too much by bad subs. "Google Play Announces Free Trials For In-App Subscription Services" http://t.co/TOLgRVak
TxDOT | 7 years 5 months
I-35W/North Tarrant Express #constantcontact http://t.co/QDzrQumu
keyetv | 7 years 5 months
Serial shotgun robbers suspects arrested. http://t.co/ka8T4U9B
Karen Townsend | 7 years 5 months
Aren't State Dept career people suppose to be non-partisan? Not the political appointees, the career people. #Libya
San Antonio Current | 7 years 5 months
Go ahead, chalk it up http://t.co/YMWpC5wM #satx #chalkitup
Caller.com | 7 years 5 months
Scanner: Bathroom on fire in 600 block of Virginia, CC fire dept. on the way
Ballotpedia | 7 years 5 months
Does your state offer early voting? Do you qualify? Find out! #election2012 http://t.co/eodxBYVD
Dallas Morning News | 7 years 5 months
Why a Dallas-area cycling coach believed Lance Armstrong was drug-free (video) http://t.co/gURdYkj1
Caller.com | 7 years 5 months
Dozens of illegal waste dumpers sentenced in Jim Wells Co.; others on the run: http://t.co/NgerCdsQ
Karen Townsend | 7 years 5 months
Consistently impressed w/raullabrador when I listen to him in Congressional hearings. #Libya
Cory Crow | 7 years 5 months
Diigo: United raises fares by up to $10 per round trip - Business - http://t.co/kWY8gwPV http://t.co/bw25JP5R
News 4 WOAI | 7 years 5 months
If you see news in or around San Antonio 'SEND IT' to @NEWS4WOAI here: http://t.co/uMqbMXQv OR email us at: NEWSDESK@WOAITV.COM
swamplot | 7 years 5 months
Mining Houston Garbage for Recycling and Compost Gold http://t.co/HMMBArMX
swamplot | 7 years 5 months
Daily Demolition Report: Tulane Highway http://t.co/JXmkSx11
KFDA NewsChannel10 | 7 years 5 months
Obama and Romney: Where they stand on the issues http://t.co/y3VrPfkM
Williamson County | 7 years 5 months
Mental Health Awareness Week FREE Webinar:"Understanding Depression-How to Help You or a Loved One" Thurs,Oct 11@1pm-https://t.co/YUWi19WY
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