in Houston, Texas
State Bar of Texas sues Attorney General Greg Abbott over records in investigation into misused funds
Monday, Jul 16, 2012, 09:53AM CST
By Steve Miller
Lady Justice

The State Bar of Texas is suing the office of Attorney General Greg Abbott over an open records decision earlier this month that gives a legal trade magazine access to records detailing an internal investigation by the state bar.

A reporter from Texas Lawyer magazine in April requested the records from the state bar, which is an administrative arm of the state’s judicial department, with regard to fiscal misappropriation of funds by a bar employee who is also a deputy clerk for the Texas Supreme Court.

The bar appealed the request, and the AG’s office ruled in favor of the reporter, telling the state bar to hand over most of what was requested with the exception of some information that was asked to be withheld by the Austin Police Department as it is part of an ongoing investigation.

In its suit against the AG’s office, the bar argues that while one provision of the state’s open records law permits the withholding of a completed audit or investigation of misappropriated funds under section 552.108 by a law enforcement agency, “it makes no sense” to permit the release of information just because it is related to the expenditure of public or other funds by a government body, “particularly when the investigation is not yet complete.”

It also argues that the AG’s ruling claimed that to be withheld, information must fall under the dictates of a mandatory exception to the open records law rather than discretionary. “There are, however, no distinctions drawn with respect to [open records law] exceptions,” the bar’s petition states.

It is rare for the AG’s office to permit the release of information relating to an open investigation. But the AG’s letter ruling is based heavily on legitimate public interest.

The state bar last year sued Abbott over a different ruling that granted access to records to a lawyer accountability group.

In that case, the ruling granted access to a number of records dealing with lawyer sanctions. The bar, in its legal action, claimed the AG’s office also made public “sensitive State Bar personnel memorandums.”

The state bar and Abbott also tangled in a 2007 case before the state Supreme Court that centered on the public nature of the home address and phone number and date of birth of members of the state bar. Abbott ruled that they were subject to disclosure. An appellate court ruled the information is not subject to open records requests.

The Austin attorney Jennifer Riggs of Riggs, Aleshire & Ray, represents the state bar in all three cases.

Riggs worked in the AG’s office from 1984 to 1992, and served for two years as chief of the office’s Open Government Section.

One of her law partners is Bill Aleshire, an oft-cited advocate of transparency and a hotline volunteer for the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas.

***
Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.

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'Lady Justice' photo by flickr user Scott*, used via a Creative Commons license.

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Tarleton State fine over underreported campus crime a lesson in power of public information
Tuesday, Jun 12, 2012, 10:18AM CST
By Mike Cronin
Tarleton logo

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan’s decision earlier this month to fine Tarleton State University $110,000 for failing to report many crimes, including sexual assault, proves the power of public access to government information.

Due to a former Tarleton State student’s open records request six years ago, the Texas A&M University System’s Stephenville school is more transparent, according to a story by the Student Press Law Center in Arlington, Va.

Then a senior, Erin Cooper-Baize filed a public-records request asking for police reports. When she and other student journalists compared them with the official data put out by the university, they found that the school had failed to report more than 70 crimes such as forcible sex offenses, assaults, drug violations and burglaries from 2003 to 2005.

Those omissions were in violation of the Clery Act, which requires schools receiving federal aid to disclose certain crime statistics and take other steps aimed at keeping students safe.

Cooper-Baize experienced what many journalists do who attempt to obtain legally defined public information from government entities: Stonewalling.

“We actually had to fight with them to even get the request done,” she told the Student Press Law Center. “They said they didn’t have to give us certain items, and we had to keep going back.”

University officials appealed the $137,500 fine levied in 2009 by the Department of Ed and got the penalty reduced to $27,500.

But Duncan was having none of it. In his ruling overturning the decision by a Department of Ed administrative-law judge, Duncan wrote:

“A single fine for issuing a crime report missing multiple crimes is tantamount to sending the message to postsecondary institutions throughout the nation that regardless of whether your crime report omits one crime or 101 crimes, the maximum fine is the same.”

The ultimate size of the fine could rise because Duncan asked the Office of Federal Student Aid to decide the punishment for Tarleton’s other unreported crimes.

Today, Tarleton is a more transparent place, with a new police chief and a Clery oversight committee, said Cooper-Baize’s instructor, Pulitzer Prize winner Dan Malone.

***
Contact Mike Cronin at mike@texaswatchdog.org or 713-228-2850. Follow him on Twitter at @michaelccronin or @texaswatchdog.

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Corsicana approves new charges for public information
Friday, Jun 08, 2012, 09:19AM CST
By Mike Cronin
cash register

Time is money – especially in Corsicana, a municipality of about 26,000 roughly an hour southeast of Dallas by car.

The city council voted unanimously earlier this week to begin charging people whose open-records requests tally at least 36 hours a year in public employees’ time, reports Janet Jacobs of the Corsicana Daily Sun.

“There are two or three people who’ve already gone past 36 hours this year,” Corsicana City Attorney Terry Jacobson said. “It does happen in the real world.”

State law allows Corsicana to put in place such a policy.

A governmental body may establish a reasonable limit on the amount of time that personnel of the governmental body are required to spend producing public information for inspection or duplication by a requestor, or providing copies of public information to a requestor, without recovering its costs attributable to that personnel time.
(b)  A time limit established under Subsection (a) may not be less than 36 hours for a requestor during the 12-month period that corresponds to the fiscal year of the governmental body.

But government agencies are still bound by the usual requirement to provide detailed estimates of charges. The attorney general has more resources on the limits on charges for public information here.

***
Contact Mike Cronin at mike@texaswatchdog.org or 713-228-2850. Follow him on Twitter at @michaelccronin or @texaswatchdog.

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Photo of cash register by flickr user sean mcmenemy, used via a Creative Commons license.

Houston Airport System official who blocked records request, lied to investigators, got bonuses and pay raises
Thursday, May 03, 2012, 12:19PM CST
By Steve Miller
planes

The human resources chief at the Houston Airport System received a $250 bonus the year she was found guilty of deceiving an investigator for the city of Houston during an inquiry into her withholding public records.

Records show that Maria Fink received the $250 payout in 2009 and 2010. An investigation concluded in June 2010 by the city’s Office of Inspector General cited Fink for failing to comply with the state’s open records laws in response to a records request filed by Texas Watchdog in October 2009.

The investigation found that Fink claimed she had received advice from the city attorney’s office that allowed her to withhold over 60 pages of a personnel file that was requested, but the specific attorney she claimed gave her that advice said she had never contacted him.

Instead, the city attorney’s office had directed her to release the information, which she initially failed to do.

Fink’s salary has increased 7.4 percent since her hire in 2009, despite the OIG finding, from $103,600 to $111,283.

Ian Wadsworth, who was found in the same investigation to have lied to city inspectors, also received bonuses of $250 in 2009 and 2010. His pay since the infraction has increased 11.4 percent from $155,000 to $172,776. Wadsworth is chief commercial officer at HAS.

Neither Fink nor Wadsworth was disciplined for their deception, which included violations of mayoral dictates, according to public records. Houston Mayor Annise Parker, who took office in January 2010, has declined to comment on the investigation.

In December 2010, Parker removed the authority of the inspector general from the police department and placed it under the auspices of the city attorney’s office. Robert Doguim, a former FBI agent who was hired in December 2010 to head the OIG, resigned in February, citing a lack of authority bestowed by the city to his office.

***
Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.

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Photo of planes at Bush Intercontinental Airport by flickr user prayitno, used via a Creative Commons license.

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Records used in other states to uncover cheating on tests not open in Texas
Friday, Mar 30, 2012, 10:26AM CST
By Steve Miller
No. 2 pencils

While other states are finding evidence of school test score manipulation, the Texas Education Agency has managed to quash open records requests that would allow the public to investigate such a thing in this state.

In two recent open records requests, the TEA has successfully argued that the information that would make an investigation possible is not a public record.

The issue is what is called erasure data, or the marks on a written test that show signs of amending an answer. (This is a sample of a question on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills, or TAKS, test.)

A certain number of wrong-to-right changes is a flag to a trained eye, and metrics and formulas have been developed that can provide a high likelihood that cheating was part of the end result, be it by teachers or students.

Analyzing erasure data led to a scandalous revelation of widespread test cheating in Georgia last year that involved dozens of investigators including a specially appointed team from the governor’s office.

As the Austin American-Statesman points out, erasure data has been cited by both the New York Times and USA Today to find evidence of cheating.

The Statesman story also mentioned the efforts of both a former teacher and a reporter who sought to obtain erasure data in Texas but were refused in similar decisions by the Attorney General’s open records division.

On June 1, the office ruled against the former teacher, as it did six weeks later in another case. It also upheld the TEA’s contention that the erasure data was part of an audit working paper, which under state law may be withheld. TEA confidentiality officer Montgomery Meitler told Texas Watchdog that he provided the AG’s office with “actual audit working papers for a pending audit” in order to make his case.

“The information submitted to the AG’s office would be a representative sample of the data requested,” Meitler said.  “So if you had [asked] for a specific audit all the erasure data, we would have to provide a representative sample.”

Then in August, the Statesman requested erasure data for the school years 2008-2009, 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 provided to the TEA by its contractor, Pearson. Again, the AG’s office received evidence that the TEA was doing an audit of the erasure data and ruled in favor of TEA.

But, "they can't just indefinitely say there is an audit going on and use that as a defense,” said Tom Gregor, an open records lawyer in Houston.

The working papers notion also contradicts statements from a TEA spokeswoman this week, who said that despite a story by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution which showed test scores in Houston and Dallas that were suspiciously high, there would be no investigation.

On Friday, TEA spokeswoman Debbie Ratcliffe said the state's erasure data was being used as part of an investigation.

"Sometimes we hear of an irregularity the day of the testing, sometimes it comes two years later," Ratcliffe said, adding that she did not know the status of the investigation based on 2008-2009 data.

The TEA investigated a number of schools in 2005 for test cheating, but the Dallas Morning News subsequently found even more instances in its own independent review. Houston ISD fired several teachers at the time.

The finding came as the TEA insisted that incidents of cheating in the state were rare. In an effort to stem dishonesty in testing, the TEA asked students to sign pledges of honor starting in 2007, among other things.

***
Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.

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Photo of No. 2 pencils by flickr user roswellsgirl, used via a Creative Commons license.

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View complaints to the Houston Office of Inspector General here
Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012, 12:59PM CST
By Steve Miller
Houston City Hall

In assembling the year’s worth of complaints to the City of Houston’s Office of the Inspector General, we engaged in a practice we loathe: Redaction.

It’s a common practice among government bodies when disseminating public information. We found that it is often done in a manner that makes no sense at all, as in the case of the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association.

When Texas Watchdog won a state Attorney General's opinion to gain access to some records in full, we found lawyers for TWIA had redacted words such as “and” and “draft,” often nonsensically.

We did it to protect the accused. In some cases, the allegations are incredibly inflammatory. It makes no sense to attach someone’s name to such a thing, so we went through 300-plus pages with a little program called PDF Pen and did our best to rid these documents of these names.

On the other hand, the complaints against City Council members, some cops and Mayor Annise Parker remain unredacted. Because of their prominence, most of those complaints had already been reported widely.

Read the complaints filed between December 2010 and September 30, 2011 here. (The city redacted the complainants' names prior to releasing the records on guidance from the AG.)

The OIG has been a question mark since Parker and her city attorney, David Feldman, decided the city needed a more official inspector general. Their mission was an abject failure; their hand-picked inspector, former FBI agent Robert Doguim, was a sound choice, but he quit within 13 months because he didn’t have the authority he needed to make the office a true investigative body. It was more of a glorified human resources department with a $538,000 payroll.

Instead, he fielded the complaints you will read here, tales of people being passed over for promotions and raises, name calling, people objecting to people who swear, and declarations of racism, sexism and other prevalent social maladies. Doguim told Texas Watchdog in January that 25 percent of the complaints were referred back to the department heads.

“I wrote to Feldman to tell him they were referred back so the managers could do their jobs,” Doguim said.

So in Philadelphia, the office of the inspector general uncovers illicit contractor schemes and bribes. In Houston, the beefed-up inspector general's office manages to clear a council member accused of using her position to obtain clients for her private law practice.

***

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


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Photo of Houston City Hall by flickr user quadrant6ix, used via a Creative Commons license.

Sunshine Week 2012: Celebrating open government -- in Texas and around the nation
Monday, Mar 12, 2012, 03:50PM CST
By Steve Miller
sunshine

It’s that week again, the one where we celebrate the idea of transparency known as Sunshine Week.

At Texas Watchdog, every week is Sunshine Week, but it’s great to see there are still media outlets that find time and space to talk about the importance of an open government. You know, one in which the people who pay for the records actually get to see them.

  • The Austin American-Statesman does a fine job outlining the importance of the state’s Public Information Law, as well as noting some recent challenges.
  • USA Today notes that Texas is among the dozen or so states that still has laws that prevent the people from seeing who gets what kind of pension, laws that we have lamented for some time. You know things are going to move slow when the very people who would be subject to such information are charged with ruling on it.
  • The Fort Worth Star-Telegram does a sterling job with its own op-ed on keeping the government open. It, too, laments the lack of transparency regarding public pensions in Texas. In a ray of hope, its piece reports that state Rep. Lon Burnam (D-Fort Worth) will introduce legislation next session that would expose the dread “double dippers,” which the Star-Telegram and other media outlets have reported on as occurring as a pattern.

Here at Texas Watchdog, we base the bulk of our reporting on public information.

  • We exposed fraud and open records violations at the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association after records showed a pattern of malfeasance at the agency, which was eventually placed into state receivership.
  • With the help of public records, we exposed the flawed workmanship in weatherization of homes for the poor that cost $22 million in federal stimulus grants. We found coverups for the poor work, false claims of work performed and handiwork that wasn’t so handy, all taxpayer funded.

Here is our bible, the state Public Information Handbook.

"Sunshine." Just saying it makes you smile, and it's great anywhere and any time you can get it.

***
Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.

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Texas Attorney General cuts off e-mail for public records filings
Wednesday, Dec 07, 2011, 06:43AM CST
By Steve Miller
mouse

The cost of obtaining public information just got less convenient and more expensive.

The state Attorney General’s open records division launches an online appeals system in February, which will require parties to cough up $30 if they want to use the system to respond to a government body’s appeal of an open records request.

The office says it will no longer accept challenges to public information requests or responses via fax or email beginning in January. Taxpayers, who used to be able to use email, will now have to pay postage fees if they want to go around the online system. Looming service cutbacks and price increases at the U.S. Postal Service impose even more cost and delay on the public’s quest for its own information.

"It will be free of charge if you mail it in, but if you use the online system it will be the $30," said Jerry Strickland, a spokesman for the AG's office. "The use of that is completely optional."

Email had become overwhelming, Strickland said. The office issued open records letter rulings for over 19,000 cases last year.

Some agencies will look at the $30 as a discount, as they currently have no problem spending $40 for a courier service to deliver appeals.

The new levy is composed of a $25 “administrative convenience fee," plus an additional $5 fee imposed by Texas.gov. It was enabled by legislation sponsored by state Rep. Linda Harper-Brown, R-Irving. The fee is projected to raise $1 million through 2013.

Harper-Brown said she was unaware that email communication regarding appeals had been eliminated, and that her intent was to open one more electronic avenue of communication with the AG's office.

"I would think that email would be included in the electronic submission," Harper-Brown said. "I was never told that the office was going to stop allowing email."

But for a private citizen or smaller news operation, the convenience, speed and low cost of email correspondence has been eliminated. Those homebound or with limited mobility will be forced to pay the fee. And to ensure receipt of responses to open records appeals, certified mail appears to be among the cheapest way to ensure delivery, with a rate that starts at $2.85.

Harper-Brown said that if taking away email causes a hardship for too many people, "there's always another session where we can rectify any unintended consequences."
 
***
Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.

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Creative Commons License
Like this story? Then steal it. This report by Texas Watchdog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. That means bloggers, citizen-journalists, and journalists may republish the story on their sites with attribution and a link to Texas Watchdog. If you do re-use the story, we'd love to hear about it. E-mail news@texaswatchdog.org.

Photo of mouse by flickr user antoniolas, used via a Creative Commons license.
Salary information for Texas utilities’ workers made public
Monday, Aug 29, 2011, 12:50PM CST
By Lee Ann O'Neal
power lines

Salaries of workers at public power utilities can no longer be withheld based on the flimsy excuse that disclosure could harm the utilities’ competitive position, following the Texas state Legislature’s passage of a bill this year.

The Denton Record-Chronicle had a solid overview of the issue this weekend, including highlights of the six-figure earners at Denton Municipal Electric.
Salaries of other city employees were already subject to release under the Texas Public Information Act.

But the state had allowed cities to withhold electric employee salaries since 1999, when lawmakers voted to deregulate the state’s power market. …
 
The new law, filed by Sen. Steve Ogden, R-Bryan, includes categories of information that qualify as competitive matters, meaning cities no longer have discretion in deciding what to withhold. The law lists employee salaries among the categories that don’t qualify as competitive matters.
Ogden’s hometown utility had gotten downright cocky with the public’s information over the last few years --- so much so that even the Bryan city manager couldn’t get a straight answer when he asked for money numbers needed to plan the city’s budget. The (Bryan-College Station) Eagle has closely followed the ins and outs there, where rates are set to increase 12 percent over the next two years and the general manager earns almost $250,000 in salary and incentive pay.
 
***
Contact Lee Ann O'Neal at 713-980-9777 or leeann@texaswatchdog.org. Follow her on Twitter at @texaswatchdog.

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Photo of power lines by flickr user shannonpatrick17, used via a Creative Commons license.
Attorney seeks records of gas drilling site in Ponder, says town failed to produce them
Monday, Jul 18, 2011, 01:35PM CST
By Kevin Lee
file folder

The town of Ponder failed to respond to a public records request for documents related to a new gas well site, according to the Fort Worth attorney who requested the records.

The attorney, Jim Bradbury, has complained to the Denton County district attorney and the attorney general’s office, the Denton Record-Chronicle reports. Bradbury says the city did not respond to his June 15 records request or the complaint he filed last week.

Bradbury requested e-mail records, applications, public notices, and any documents identifying any city official paid by Devon Energy, the operator of the well.

Government agencies in Texas must produce records promptly, under the state Public Information Act. If the agency believes the records can be withheld, the agency must seek a ruling from the attorney general within 10 business days of receiving the request.

Ponder Mayor Scott McCarty told the Record-Chronicle that he had received the formal complaint but that he did not recall receiving the original public information request.

Ponder residents who live near the well site have voiced their displeasure, saying “they had no idea what would happen to the site, previously set aside for homes and a town park, until the energy company’s bulldozers showed up,” the newspaper reported. The Ponder Town Council is expected to vote Tuesday on a moratorium on new drilling permits.
 
***
Contact Kevin Lee at 713-228-3733 or kevin@texaswatchdog.org.

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Photo of files by flickr user Tim Morgan, used via a Creative Commons license.
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APRIL 5, 2017 / Weeding out the audience at the Alley is . . . . . . a feature, not a bug. Houston's Alley Theatre is running "An Act of God," a loosely dramatized collection of irreverent one-liners...
Update:2 years 11 months
Unca Darrell
Statewide primary rumors It's that stage of the election cycle where politicians are trying to figure out if they should run for something else or stay put. ...
Update:2 years 11 months
Rick Perry vs The World
Is Ted Cruz vulnerable? Is Ted Cruz vulnerable? Not really. Sure, he's not liked, Texans think Ted puts Ted first, his approval rating is upside down, etc...
Update:2 years 11 months
Rick Perry vs The World
MARCH 16, 2017 / Jim Webb on what it means to be a redneck, and . . . . . . why redneck culture matters. In 2004 Jim Webb wrote Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America. Though the 2016 presidential...
Update:2 years 11 months
Unca Darrell
MARCH 3, 2017 -- Goodbye, and thanks, to Thomas Sowell THOMAS SOWELL, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and one of America's most important public intellectuals, retired from...
Update:3 years 6 days
Unca Darrell
March 2, 2017 / The poem our teachers got wrong TWO ROADS diverged in a wood, and I -- I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. Generations of commencement...
Update:3 years 6 days
Unca Darrell
FEBRUARY 27 / Eric Hoffer on . . . . . . baby boomers and alienated intellectuals. "SCRATCH AN INTELLECTUAL, and you find a would-be aristocrat who loathes the sight, the...
Update:3 years 1 week
Unca Darrell
2017 Project: January “Progress” There are two different ways to interpret my 2017 project: that it's a way more complicated New Years Resolution, or that it is essentially...
Update:3 years 1 month
Greg's Opinion
Ted Cruz's first senate term in a nutshell The National Review's Tim Alberta switched to Politico, and one of his opening pieces put Ted Cruz's first term in a nutshell It...
Update:3 years 1 month
Rick Perry vs The World
Andrea Parquet-Taylor named KTVT CBS 11 news director Former KHOU 11 assistant news director Andrea Parquet-Taylor named Vice President, News Director for KTVT CBS 11 Andrea...
Update:3 years 1 month
Mike McGuff
VIDEO: KPRC 2 10pm newscast (1-24-99) ...
Update:3 years 1 month
Mike McGuff
Democrats actually thought Wendy Davis was a serious candidate? Hat tip to Willisms: VIDEO- Wendy Davis being Wendy Davis: https://t.co/SHq3ACGVDJ #txlege— Will Franklin (@WILLisms) January 24,...
Update:3 years 1 month
Rick Perry vs The World
Luke Bryan to sing National Anthem as part of Super Bowl LI on FOX ​ Country music superstar LUKE BRYAN will sing the National Anthem as part of Super Bowl LI pregame festivities at NRG Stadium in Houston...
Update:3 years 1 month
Mike McGuff
Tweets
Karen Townsend | 7 years 9 months
"Patrick F. Kennedy is a career foreign service officer" - http://t.co/GOrCe0IS
Peter Corbett ✈ | 7 years 9 months
I'm at McCarran International Airport (LAS) w/ @almacy http://t.co/KvmId07i
KERA Public Media | 7 years 9 months
TONIGHT at 7pm on KERA TV: Presidential Debate: Learn more at PBS NewsHour. http://t.co/Z9kYdun8
PBS MediaShift | 7 years 9 months
Tech Snafus Make Bill O'Reilly/Jon Stewart 'Rumble' More of a Stumble http://t.co/4OfeBlrG (@kegill | @pbsmediashift) #rumble2012
Will Sullivan | 7 years 9 months
Great addition, been burned too much by bad subs. "Google Play Announces Free Trials For In-App Subscription Services" http://t.co/TOLgRVak
TxDOT | 7 years 9 months
I-35W/North Tarrant Express #constantcontact http://t.co/QDzrQumu
keyetv | 7 years 9 months
Serial shotgun robbers suspects arrested. http://t.co/ka8T4U9B
Karen Townsend | 7 years 9 months
Aren't State Dept career people suppose to be non-partisan? Not the political appointees, the career people. #Libya
San Antonio Current | 7 years 9 months
Go ahead, chalk it up http://t.co/YMWpC5wM #satx #chalkitup
Caller.com | 7 years 9 months
Scanner: Bathroom on fire in 600 block of Virginia, CC fire dept. on the way
Ballotpedia | 7 years 9 months
Does your state offer early voting? Do you qualify? Find out! #election2012 http://t.co/eodxBYVD
Dallas Morning News | 7 years 9 months
Why a Dallas-area cycling coach believed Lance Armstrong was drug-free (video) http://t.co/gURdYkj1
Caller.com | 7 years 9 months
Dozens of illegal waste dumpers sentenced in Jim Wells Co.; others on the run: http://t.co/NgerCdsQ
Karen Townsend | 7 years 9 months
Consistently impressed w/raullabrador when I listen to him in Congressional hearings. #Libya
Cory Crow | 7 years 9 months
Diigo: United raises fares by up to $10 per round trip - Business - http://t.co/kWY8gwPV http://t.co/bw25JP5R
News 4 WOAI | 7 years 9 months
If you see news in or around San Antonio 'SEND IT' to @NEWS4WOAI here: http://t.co/uMqbMXQv OR email us at: NEWSDESK@WOAITV.COM
swamplot | 7 years 9 months
Mining Houston Garbage for Recycling and Compost Gold http://t.co/HMMBArMX
swamplot | 7 years 9 months
Daily Demolition Report: Tulane Highway http://t.co/JXmkSx11
KFDA NewsChannel10 | 7 years 9 months
Obama and Romney: Where they stand on the issues http://t.co/y3VrPfkM
Williamson County | 7 years 9 months
Mental Health Awareness Week FREE Webinar:"Understanding Depression-How to Help You or a Loved One" Thurs,Oct 11@1pm-https://t.co/YUWi19WY
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