in Houston, Texas
Daughters of the Republic of Texas misused state funds, failed to preserve Alamo, attorney general finds
Wednesday, Nov 21, 2012, 11:47AM CST
By Mark Lisheron
Alamo

Judging by a Texas Attorney General’s report, the only thing the Daughters of the Republic of Texas weren’t responsible for at the Alamo was killing off Crockett, Bowie and Travis.

The volunteer custodian for the Alamo for more than a century failed to preserve and maintain the shrine to Texas independence, misused and used state funds for its own benefit and violated state nonprofit organization laws in the process, according to a 38-page report provided to the Texas Legislature.

(You can read the entire report here.)

The Attorney General’s office released the report more than a year after concluding an investigation that began with a complaint of mismanagement by the DRT made in June 2010, the report says.

Daughters of the Republic volunteers continue to provide services at the Alamo, but under the direction of the state General Land Office, given authority over operations by the Legislature in 2011.

Even then, the report says, DRT leaders were not altogether honest in describing their stewardship of the Alamo to lawmakers.

Only because the Legislature removed the DRT from direct control of the Alamo is the Attorney General’s office refraining from legal action against the group, the report says.

Karen Thompson, president of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, told the San Antonio Express News the organization was shocked “at the outrageously inaccurate conclusions within the report.” Thompson said the report was not an accurate picture of her organization today.

The Attorney General’s report makes clear that much of its criticism is directed at DRT leadership.

“This report recognizes that the DRT and its members have committed countless volunteer hours to serving the Alamo and the State of Texas,” the report says. “Indeed, generations of DRT members have demonstrated tireless commitment to the Alamo.”

***
Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org or on Twitter at @marktxwatchdog.

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Photo of the Alamo by flickr user Rhubarble, used via a Creative Commons license.

Because of Texas legislature, names of finalists for Angelo State president kept secret
Thursday, Sep 27, 2012, 01:51PM CST
By Steve Miller
capitol

The public can be prevented from knowing the candidates for president of Angelo State University because of a law passed by legislators in 1993 and updated last session.

A story in the San Angelo-Standard Times reports that there are four finalists in the search, but the university will not reveal them due to the law, stemming from a bill that was authored by then-state Sen. Bill Haley and updated by state Sen. Judith Zaffirini.

 

Zaffirini defended the secrecy, telling the newspaper that "by keeping the names confidential, and avoiding releasing information that could put a presidential candidate's current job at jeopardy, we get a better selection of candidates.”

 

In December 2010, on the eve of last session, Zaffirini received a $1,000 contribution from lobbyist Ben Barnes of the Ben Barnes Group, which that year was among the stable of lobbyists for the Texas Tech University System, which oversees Angelo State. Barnes also contributed to Zaffirini in 2006 and 2011.

 

Haley and Zaffirini were on the state Senate Education Committee together in 1993.

 

The names of candidates for public jobs are generally considered public record, although government agencies often violate the law and keep them private, as the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association has done.

 

***

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


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Photo of 'Texas Capitol' by flickr user ilovemypit, used via a Creative Commons license.

Texas state Sen. Robert Duncan calls for state property tax for schools
Tuesday, Sep 25, 2012, 12:44PM CST
By Mark Lisheron
tax

State Sen. Robert Duncan has banged his biennial gong for the state to take over property tax collection for public education.

Normally timed prior to a session of the Legislature to get ahead of the Chicken Little school finance crowd, Duncan, R-Lubbock, may be the beneficiary of the claxon sounds of nearly half the public school districts suing the state of Texas.

The lawsuit is scheduled to commence Oct. 22 in Austin.

An influential longtime member of the Senate Finance Committee and its Subcommittee on Public Education Funding, Duncan is asking the Legislature to consider a statewide tax of $1 for every $100 valuation of property to operate all public schools in Texas, the Dallas Morning News reports.

The statewide tax would supplant local property taxes, but allow individual school districts to add as much as 17 cents per $100 valuation more for their own programs, according to Duncan’s proposal.

As he did right about this time in 2010, Duncan promised, as politicians are wont to do, a statewide property tax would not - and we repeat on the senator’s behalf - not be a tax increase.

Texas last taxed property to pay for public education in 1975, according to a report on the impact of such a tax prepared last year by the Property Tax Assistance Division of the state Comptroller’s office.

Less than a third of the states have a statewide property tax, and only a handful of them use any of the money collected to fund public education, a report from the National Conference of State Legislatures says.

However sane Duncan sounds as he continues to present this alternative funding universe, expect the thunder of local control advocacy to join in the noisy school finance symphony, performed from now until the end of the 2013 session.

***
Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org or on Twitter at @marktxwatchdog.

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Photo of 'tax' by flickr user 401(K) 2012, used via a Creative Commons license.

Open States site launched by Sunlight Foundation to track legislation
Thursday, Aug 02, 2012, 11:18AM CST
By Mike Cronin
capitol

The Sunlight Foundation has launched the beta version of a new site to help voters track legislation in their respective states.

Open States currently encompasses 19 states, including Texas, and the District of Columbia. The Sunlight Foundation is a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that advocates for more government transparency and accountability.

Particularly helpful is Sunlight’s easy access to bills being considered by a state legislature, a great supplement to the presentation at the Texas Legislature’s website.

Zubedah Nanfuka, a grassroots organizer with the Sunlight Foundation, listed other features of the new site:

+Every page has a list of sources in the footer that can be used for checking data against the official state website or for directly citing the state.

+The search box at the top of OpenStates.org searches across all bills and legislators; type in a name or the number of a bill you're interested in to go to the relevant detail pages.

+Bill searches will also link to other Sunlight Foundation projects, like the Scout legislative alert system and the Influence Explorer of campaign finance data.

Sunlight Foundation staff invite citizen feedback on the new site so they can improve it. To comment, go to http://openstates.org/contact/.

Besides Texas, OpenStates.org also includes data so far for Alaska, Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Montana, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Utah and Wisconsin. The plan is to expand to all 50 states, Nanfuka said.

***
Contact Mike Cronin at mike@texaswatchdog.org or 713-228-2850. Follow him on Twitter at@michaelccronin or @texaswatchdog.

Keep up with all the latest news from Texas Watchdog. Fan our page on Facebook, follow us on Twitterand Scribd, and fan us on YouTube. Join our network on de.licio.us, and put our RSS feeds in your newsreader. We're also on MySpace, Digg, FriendFeed, and tumblr.

Photo of the Texas Capitol by flickr user IPBrian, used via a Creative Commons license.

Will the Texas legislature abolish TWIA? Rep. John Smithee, who wants to reform the windstorm insurance agency, says no, but the TWIA kill bill will spark debate.
Friday, Jun 17, 2011, 08:09AM CST
By Mark Lisheron
ikel

Piqued by a state-run coastal insurance system Texas can neither live with nor without, inland Sen. Troy Fraser on Thursday decided he had had enough.

But before filing his Senate Bill 44 that would euthanize the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association, Fraser, R-Horseshoe Bay, got in touch with Rep. John Smithee,  R-Amarillo, chairman of the House Insurance Committee and a veteran of 20 years of Windstorm Insurance Association legislation.

“He asked me if his bill would be damaging to the overall effort of what we’re trying to do here,” Smithee said by cell phone Thursday night driving to Amarillo. “Otherwise, he wouldn’t do it. I told him it was all right. I think he mainly wanted to get the idea on the table for discussion.”

It is an idea Smithee knows from experience there is no political will to carry out, in spite of the 19 other non-coastal legislators who signed on to Fraser’s bill.

“There is no way the House would support it,” Smithee said. “But I understand the frustration. TWIA is a concept that doesn’t work and will never work.”

Fraser’s bill  (a list of the senators who signed on is included with the bill information) gives the state whatever time it might take to phase out covering 243,537 homeowners in 14 coastal counties who could not otherwise get catastrophic storm damage coverage.

Instead, it would force private insurance companies in Texas to write policies for a kind of coverage they abandoned more than 40 years ago, prompting the state to create the Texas Windstorm Insurance Agency.

“The Texas Legislature has spent the previous three sessions working on legislation to correct the association and its inherent funding problems,” Fraser said in a statement released to the press Thursday. “I think after three sessions, we should recognize that TWIA is a problem that cannot be solved and the association should be abolished.”

However, there are just as many problems - well aware of over the last three sessions by Fraser and others that make killing off TWIA nigh on impossible, Smithee said.

Just what might compel an industry to re-enter a market they found unprofitable two generations ago and now dominated by a quasi-state monopoly setting rates impossible to compete with, Smithee asked.

If you allow insurers to ask for a real market rate, the increase in insurance costs for TWIA policy holders will be brutal, he said. If those rate increases are spread across all policy holders, be prepared for a statewide uproar, Smithee said.

None of this was part of House Bill 272 introduced by Smithee at the beginning of the session, passed in the House, stalled in the Senate in the regular session and passed again by the House in this special session. Smithee’s bill, now called Senate Bill 3, focused on limiting the exposure of the state to thousands of lawsuits filed by TWIA policy holders in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike in 2008 and the administrative collapse of the association earlier this year.

Hundreds of millions of dollars in the more than $2 billion TWIA has paid out for Ike lawsuits have gone to damages. As many as 1,800 lawsuits on file have not been settled and more are filed every week.

Smithee’s bill seeks to end the practice of a policy holder seeking triple a settlement amount in damages. Any restriction on the ability of a TWIA policy holder to sue has been challenged, with vigor, by Texas trial lawyers, led by Steve Mostyn, whose Houston firm has made millions of dollars settling these lawsuits.

Smithee’s motives for his bill were pragmatic. “There is never any discussion of raising rates that make TWIA an unbeatable competitor,” Smithee said. “Those rates are set based on political rather than business considerations. If you close that avenue of raising revenue, the alternative is just to try to contain your losses.

“The truth is, we don’t have the resources  to cover a high impact hurricane.”

The antagonisms between state stewards trying to rein in spending and trail lawyers trying to protect their clients’ right to due process were revived when SB 3 came back for a hearing Tuesday  before the Senate Business and Commerce Committee.

When a meeting Thursday that was to have included a vote on the bill was cancelled, it was clear the Senate, or at least a bloc of coastal senators, was not satisfied with the curbs on damages collection.

When a bloc of inland senators signed on with Fraser’s bill later in the day it was clear just how broad and general dissatisfaction was with TWIA.

Smithee by nature is unperturbed, given the added incentive of having been told by Gov. Rick Perry and Lt. David Dewhurst there will be a Texas Windstorm Insurance Association bill passed this summer.

“We’re close on some issues, but on some of the bigger issues, like claims settlement, there are still disagreements. We’ll have to keep working at it.”
 
***
Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org or on Twitter at @marktxwatchdog.

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Photo of Hurricane Ike from NASA.
The Amazon deadline has passed, a $269m tax bill to Texas remains unpaid and three legislators file bills to resolve the matter
Thursday, Apr 14, 2011, 10:56AM CST
By Mark Lisheron
amazon

A self-set deadline has passed, a $269 million tax bill is unpaid, lawsuits and legislation are pending and goods are still coming into and going out of the Amazon distribution center in Irving.
 
Officials at Amazon, which has been fighting in court  with the Texas Comptroller over taxes the state says the online retailer owes, told the Austin American-Statesman and the Dallas Morning News that they did not cease operations on April 12 as they had threatened in February.
 
The nub of what is already a protracted dispute is the Comptroller contends that Amazon’s Texas distribution center is, by legal definition, a physical presence requiring the business to collect taxes on sales in the state. The $269 million is the Comptroller’s tally for taxes on Amazon’s Texas sales in 2005 through 2009.
 
Amazon is defending its position on physical presence in court here and in several other states.
 
Lawyers for Amazon are also questioning how the Comptroller arrived at its hefty sales tax total.
 
Not content to wait for the courts to settle the matter, legislators have introduced three bills, two that would make Amazon responsible for sales tax collection and one that would maintain the status quo.
 
House Bill 2403, by Rep. John Otto, R-Dayton, which would define a distribution center as a retailer in the tax code, has passed out of committee and is awaiting scheduling for a vote in the House.
 
House Bill 1317 by Rep. Elliott Naishtat, D-Austin, which is stuck in committee, would change the law to say that agreements with affiliate marketers in Texas is enough to establish the physical presence trigger for sales taxes.
 
The lone defender of Amazon’s current way of doing business, Rep. Linda Harper-Brown, R-Irving, filed, but has done nothing with House Bill 2719. Harper-Brown’s bill states more plainly that distribution centers like the Amazon center in her district, are not retail outlets.
 
***
Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org.

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Photo of 'Thanks Amazon' by flickr user abdelazer, used via a Creative Commons license.
Travis County DA investigating allegations of fraud at state insurance agency TWIA
Monday, Mar 07, 2011, 02:36PM CST
By Steve Miller
Hurricane Ike

The Travis County District Attorney’s public integrity office, together with two state agencies, is probing possible fraud stemming from payments following Hurricane Ike by the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association.
 
The office, with the Texas Department of Insurance fraud team and the Texas State Auditor’s office, is looking into allegations that a Hurricane Ike claims adjuster was paid for work that was not done, and that claims were paid based on that outside adjuster’s say-so, an assistant DA confirmed in an interview. The investigation is also seeking specifics on the dismissals in December of two high-ranking claims employees at TWIA, Reggie Warren and Bill Knarr.
 
Both employees were given generous severance packages, first reported on by Texas Watchdog. TWIA boss Jim Oliver last month told the Texas Legislature’s House Committee on Insurance that the packages – which included a 2010 Ford pickup truck for Warren -  were to ensure the two would cooperate in any lawsuits against TWIA or other issues down the road.
 
Oliver initially said the two resigned, but others have confirmed that they were fired.
 
The investigation is focused on Ike claims, but a broader look at the office is also part of the sweep.
 
“Right now, it is most likely this investigation is dealing with Ike claims, but we do need to look at the whole thing,” said Gregg Cox, assistant district attorney in the public integrity unit. “We’re looking at all possible wrongdoing that might have occurred.”
 
Last week, TWIA was placed under administrative oversight by the state insurance department, which uncovered the potentially fraudulent payments. The TWIA board announced that Oliver would be replaced, pending a final vote later this month.

***
Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.

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Photo of Hurricane Ike path by flickr user eschipul, used via a Creative Commons license.
Voter ID heads for Texas state House after passage in Senate
Thursday, Jan 27, 2011, 09:03AM CST
By Steve Miller
vote here

Republicans in the state Senate sent a voter ID bill to the House Wednesday after agreeing to add a concealed weapon license to the list of acceptable identifications needed to cast a ballot.

 

The bill was passed along party lines, 19-11, with Democrat Carlos Uresti absent.


The senators also approved an amendment that would kill the bill if the Legislature fails to appropriate money to cover the cost of implementation, estimated to be around $2 million. Republicans say that cost would be covered by federal funds from the Help America Vote Act.


Democrats complained that voter ID would not deter voter fraud, insisting that the mail-in ballot system has accounted for most cases of voter fraud in the state


From an Austin Chronicle story:

(State Sen. Royce) ”West noted that many experts agree the greatest potential fraud is in absentee ballots, not in-person voter impersonation. 'We’ve done nothing on that,' West said. 'I hope we’ll take off our blue and red jerseys after tonight and take care of the business of Texas.'"

And from a Houston Chronicle story, Jim Wells County elections administrator Pearlie Valadez said:

"Most voter fraud would be in the mail-in ballots, and the elderly are targeted because they are vulnerable. A photo ID would not have any effect on fraud in early voting.”

If the bill becomes law – and that appears inevitable as it heads for the Republican-dominated House  – it will likely face legal challenges. Texas' bill was patterned after Indiana's voter ID bill, which was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2008.

 

Contact Steve Miller at 832-303-9420 or stevemiller@texaswatchdog.org.


Keep up with all the latest news from Texas Watchdog. Fan our page on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and Scribd, and fan us on YouTube. Join our network on de.licio.us, and put our RSS feed in your newsreader. We're also onMySpaceDiggFriendFeed, NewsVine and tumblr.


Photo of 'vote here' sign by flickr user myJon, used via a Creative Commons license.

Houston ISD, others to push legislature for upfront payments for public records
Monday, Jan 10, 2011, 10:51AM CST
By Lynn Walsh
Receipt

Want public records from your local school system? You might want to be ready to fork over the cash before you get the records.

Houston’s public school system will be among the Texas governments asking legislators to allow them to require people to pay up front for public records requests before the district makes the records public-- something not currently allowed by Texas’ open records law.

This isn’t the first time local government agencies in Texas have asked for such a change, an open government advocate said.

“In recent years, HISD -- and, it’s my understanding, other districts, too -- have seen an increase in public information requests, and although we do not have a problem complying, we felt that the district should be adequately compensated to reflect the time and resources we spend on complying with these requests,” Rebecca Flores, the Houston Independent School District's government relations director, said in an e-mail.

Lawmakers have also asked school districts to identify situations in which the districts are legally obligated to do something, but for which the state does not provide the funding to cover the costs, Flores said. The state legislature convenes next week in Austin.

Right now the law requires a government agency, like HISD, to “provide a requestor with an itemized statement of charges” if the request will cost the district more than $40. This statement, according to the law, is “to be provided before copies are made … the itemized statement must be provided free of charge.

The Houston district also wants the ability to ignore requests from anyone who still owes money from a previous records request.

"The Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas believes there are fair and reasonable cost allowances already on the books,” said Keith Elkins, the foundation's executive director. “Providing public information should not be about making a profit but about providing quality customer service to taxpayers, who already pay HISD's bills."

According to the legislative agenda trustees unanimously approved in October, the school district wants legislators to:

“Allow districts to charge the actual costs for the production of all materials, including the recovery of actual costs of personnel time, to comply with open records requests.  Districts should be able to require actual payment of costs prior to compliance and failure to pay after committing to pay relieves districts of any obligation to comply with additional open records requests made by that entity until past balances are paid.”

Right now the Texas Public Information Act requires school districts, like all government agencies, to only charge what the state attorney general allows them to, unless they submit a request for an exemption, said Joe Larsen, a Houston attorney who is also a board member for the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas.

Governmental bodies must provide a detailed cost estimate for any charges in excess of $40,” Larsen said. “The requestor must either confirm within ten days that he/she will accept the charges or the request is considered withdrawn.  As a practical matter, the requestor must pay before he/she gets the stuff.”

Texas public information laws outline specific costs for some items like a DVD, which is $3, and a CD which is $1. Other items like a tape cartridge or magnetic tape can be charged at the actual cost of the item, according to the law.

The law also allows HISD and other government groups to charge for computer programming costs and the labor costs associated with gathering the information.

According to Elkins, this is not the first time government agencies have gone to the Texas legislature to try exempt their records from the law’s cost provisions. “The bill is worded slightly differently each time, but the bottom line is the same: They want to make a profit from the sale of electronic copies of their records to the public,” Elkins said.

HISD is also asking that school districts be allowed the same exemption from infrastructure fees that state agencies colleges enjoy, like the new Houston drainage fee, Proposition 1, passed by Harris County voters in 2010. HISD trustees took a stand against the fee last year and said it would cost the district 70 teaching positions.

The 82nd session of the Texas Legislature is set to begin next Tuesday, Jan. 11.

Do you think government agencies should be allowed to charge upfront costs for public records? We want to know what you think. Contact Lynn Walsh at Lynn@TexasWatchdog.org, 713-228-2850 or on Twitter @LWalsh.

Keep up with all the latest news from Texas Watchdog. Fan our page on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and Scribd, and fan us on YouTube. Join our network on de.licio.us, and put our RSS feed in your newsreader. We're also onMySpaceDiggFriendFeed, NewsVine and tumblr.

Creative Commons

Like this story? Then steal it. This report by Texas Watchdog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. That means bloggers, citizen-journalists, and journalists may republish the story on their sites with attribution and a link to Texas Watchdog. If you do re-use the story, we'd love to hear about it. E-mail news@texaswatchdog.org.

Photo by flickr user kevinspencer, used under a Creative Commons license.

Rep. Charlie Geren: Changes needed in reporting of expenses by Texas legislators
Wednesday, Dec 01, 2010, 04:07PM CST
By Mark Lisheron
txcapitol

Rep. Charlie Geren would like changes to the reporting of expenses by legislators making it tougher for colleagues like Rep. Joe Driver, who is now the focus of a criminal investigation for findings that he charged both the state and his campaign for tens of thousands of dollars for travel and other expenses.

 

In an Associated Press story today, Geren, R-Fort Worth, says he thinks legislators should be required to disclose reimbursements made for their expenses and to put in writing any time they believe they are entitled to taxpayer reimbursement. Geren says he intends to meet with House Speaker Joe Straus and the state Ethics Commission to press for these reporting changes.


The call for reform stems froma disclosure by Associated Press this past summer that Driver, R-Garland, had for many years had taken taxpayers and campaign reimbursement for the same expenses like luxury hotels, airline ticket and meals. Although he has steadfastly maintained he didn't know what he was doing was wrong, he did pay back $49,426 to his own campaign after the initial Associated Press inquiry.


Gregg Cox, head of an official corruption unit for the Travis County District Attorney's office, says, "We were presented a complaint that appeared to be sufficient to require additional investigation to determine whether or not the law was violated. Now that the election has passed the review, and the investigation is taking place."


Driver was re-elected to his tenth two-year term on Nov. 2.

 

Contact Mark Lisheron at 512-299-2318 or mark@texaswatchdog.org.

 

Keep up with all the latest news from Texas Watchdog. Fan our page on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and Scribd, and fan us on YouTube. Join our network on de.licio.us, and put our RSS feed in your newsreader. We're also on MySpace, Digg, FriendFeed, NewsVine and tumblr.

 

Photo of Texas State Capitol by flickr user roland, used via a Creative Commons license.

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Droppin' F bombs, Beto O'Rourke style It's not often that a politician decides to start cursing repeatedly during speeches and interviews. But that hasn't stopped...
Update:2 years 10 months
Rick Perry vs The World
APRIL 5, 2017 / Weeding out the audience at the Alley is . . . . . . a feature, not a bug. Houston's Alley Theatre is running "An Act of God," a loosely dramatized collection of irreverent one-liners...
Update:2 years 11 months
Unca Darrell
Statewide primary rumors It's that stage of the election cycle where politicians are trying to figure out if they should run for something else or stay put. ...
Update:2 years 11 months
Rick Perry vs The World
Is Ted Cruz vulnerable? Is Ted Cruz vulnerable? Not really. Sure, he's not liked, Texans think Ted puts Ted first, his approval rating is upside down, etc...
Update:2 years 11 months
Rick Perry vs The World
MARCH 16, 2017 / Jim Webb on what it means to be a redneck, and . . . . . . why redneck culture matters. In 2004 Jim Webb wrote Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America. Though the 2016 presidential...
Update:2 years 11 months
Unca Darrell
MARCH 3, 2017 -- Goodbye, and thanks, to Thomas Sowell THOMAS SOWELL, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and one of America's most important public intellectuals, retired from...
Update:3 years 5 days
Unca Darrell
March 2, 2017 / The poem our teachers got wrong TWO ROADS diverged in a wood, and I -- I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. Generations of commencement...
Update:3 years 5 days
Unca Darrell
FEBRUARY 27 / Eric Hoffer on . . . . . . baby boomers and alienated intellectuals. "SCRATCH AN INTELLECTUAL, and you find a would-be aristocrat who loathes the sight, the...
Update:3 years 1 week
Unca Darrell
2017 Project: January “Progress” There are two different ways to interpret my 2017 project: that it's a way more complicated New Years Resolution, or that it is essentially...
Update:3 years 1 month
Greg's Opinion
Ted Cruz's first senate term in a nutshell The National Review's Tim Alberta switched to Politico, and one of his opening pieces put Ted Cruz's first term in a nutshell It...
Update:3 years 1 month
Rick Perry vs The World
Andrea Parquet-Taylor named KTVT CBS 11 news director Former KHOU 11 assistant news director Andrea Parquet-Taylor named Vice President, News Director for KTVT CBS 11 Andrea...
Update:3 years 1 month
Mike McGuff
VIDEO: KPRC 2 10pm newscast (1-24-99) ...
Update:3 years 1 month
Mike McGuff
Democrats actually thought Wendy Davis was a serious candidate? Hat tip to Willisms: VIDEO- Wendy Davis being Wendy Davis: https://t.co/SHq3ACGVDJ #txlege— Will Franklin (@WILLisms) January 24,...
Update:3 years 1 month
Rick Perry vs The World
Luke Bryan to sing National Anthem as part of Super Bowl LI on FOX ​ Country music superstar LUKE BRYAN will sing the National Anthem as part of Super Bowl LI pregame festivities at NRG Stadium in Houston...
Update:3 years 1 month
Mike McGuff
Tweets
Karen Townsend | 7 years 9 months
"Patrick F. Kennedy is a career foreign service officer" - http://t.co/GOrCe0IS
Peter Corbett ✈ | 7 years 9 months
I'm at McCarran International Airport (LAS) w/ @almacy http://t.co/KvmId07i
KERA Public Media | 7 years 9 months
TONIGHT at 7pm on KERA TV: Presidential Debate: Learn more at PBS NewsHour. http://t.co/Z9kYdun8
PBS MediaShift | 7 years 9 months
Tech Snafus Make Bill O'Reilly/Jon Stewart 'Rumble' More of a Stumble http://t.co/4OfeBlrG (@kegill | @pbsmediashift) #rumble2012
Will Sullivan | 7 years 9 months
Great addition, been burned too much by bad subs. "Google Play Announces Free Trials For In-App Subscription Services" http://t.co/TOLgRVak
TxDOT | 7 years 9 months
I-35W/North Tarrant Express #constantcontact http://t.co/QDzrQumu
keyetv | 7 years 9 months
Serial shotgun robbers suspects arrested. http://t.co/ka8T4U9B
Karen Townsend | 7 years 9 months
Aren't State Dept career people suppose to be non-partisan? Not the political appointees, the career people. #Libya
San Antonio Current | 7 years 9 months
Go ahead, chalk it up http://t.co/YMWpC5wM #satx #chalkitup
Caller.com | 7 years 9 months
Scanner: Bathroom on fire in 600 block of Virginia, CC fire dept. on the way
Ballotpedia | 7 years 9 months
Does your state offer early voting? Do you qualify? Find out! #election2012 http://t.co/eodxBYVD
Dallas Morning News | 7 years 9 months
Why a Dallas-area cycling coach believed Lance Armstrong was drug-free (video) http://t.co/gURdYkj1
Caller.com | 7 years 9 months
Dozens of illegal waste dumpers sentenced in Jim Wells Co.; others on the run: http://t.co/NgerCdsQ
Karen Townsend | 7 years 9 months
Consistently impressed w/raullabrador when I listen to him in Congressional hearings. #Libya
Cory Crow | 7 years 9 months
Diigo: United raises fares by up to $10 per round trip - Business - http://t.co/kWY8gwPV http://t.co/bw25JP5R
News 4 WOAI | 7 years 9 months
If you see news in or around San Antonio 'SEND IT' to @NEWS4WOAI here: http://t.co/uMqbMXQv OR email us at: NEWSDESK@WOAITV.COM
swamplot | 7 years 9 months
Mining Houston Garbage for Recycling and Compost Gold http://t.co/HMMBArMX
swamplot | 7 years 9 months
Daily Demolition Report: Tulane Highway http://t.co/JXmkSx11
KFDA NewsChannel10 | 7 years 9 months
Obama and Romney: Where they stand on the issues http://t.co/y3VrPfkM
Williamson County | 7 years 9 months
Mental Health Awareness Week FREE Webinar:"Understanding Depression-How to Help You or a Loved One" Thurs,Oct 11@1pm-https://t.co/YUWi19WY
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